Archives for posts with tag: conceptual photography

Family resemblance is a curious thing. When two immediate family members look so much alike, it can be jarring. North Carolina bred, Arizona based photographer Bobby Neel Adams capitalizes on this phenomenon of startling likeness in his stellar FamilyTree series. Adams captures portraits of two immediate family members (usually mother/daughter and father/son pairings) dressed and posed similarly. Rather than a tidy side-by-side composition, Adams tears them down the middle, then places two halves together. This technique works so well, both conceptual and aesthetically. Well done.

Via bobbyneeladams.com

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Conceptual food photography has got to be one of our favorite niche disciplines lately, only confirmed by this excellent collaboration between Sydney-based creatives Enrico Becker and Matt Harris. Created as visuals to accompany editorial on genetically modified foods, these photos could easily stand on their own. We love the choice of colors and thoughtful compositions. The pastel tones of the produce, along with the bar codes of course, push the work into surreal territory. And quite effectively, we might add. In his own words, Becker explains, “As shooting style, we were going for a more pastel monochromatic still-life style approach. The end result of the shoot was combined in an awesome two-spread magazine layout with a well written article about genetically modified food by Matt Harris. The idea was to create a combination between the photography and the written text.” Oh, and did we mention these guys are also students? Nice work, by any measure.

Via enricobecker.com

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We love an element of surprise in art, and the work of Spanish photographer García de Marina has plenty of if. In fact, much of de Marina’s work centers on the unexpected. His compositions are witty reinterpretations of everyday objects, seen through his unique lens. de Marina doesn’t just document objects, but distorts their meaning and purpose in clever and humorous ways. There’s certain accessibility to his work, that allows it to be enjoyed and understood through a visual language that transcends age and culture. Just brilliant.

Similar posts here and here and here.

Via garciademarina.net and Facebook

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We certainly have a thing for creative food photography (here and here and here), so it’s no surprise that the inventive work of London-based photographer David Sykes caught our eye. Sykes looks at food from an unconventional perspective, and we particularly like the subtle injection of humor in his work. In fact, it’s not exactly food photography, but food-like. His keen eye for composition and smart use of color prove that Sykes is more than a quirky photographer, but a terrific conceptual artist.

Via davidsykes.com

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Photographs frequently serve as links to the past, often summoning up memories of a time that came before. Tennessee-based photographer Greg Sand capitalizes on this association, which is fundamental to his philosophy as an artist. In his own words, Sand says: “My work is about memory, the passage of time, mortality and the photograph’s role in shaping our experience of loss. Photography’s unique ability to capture a fleeting moment allows it to expose the temporality of life.” In his series entitled Remnants, Sand creates stunning works composed of three found photos from different times in the subject’s past, cut into strips and skillfully woven together to form a sort of cloth-like composite portrait. Sand says of woven cloth as a metaphor for memory: “As Peter Stallybrass writes in Worn Worlds, ‘The magic of cloth is that it receives us: receives our smells, our sweat, our shape even.’ This is one of the marvels of memory as well: we perceive each moment in our lives; these are eventually woven together to form our memory. Each piece in this series creates a likeness of an individual that–rather than depicting an accurate visual representation of that person at any given time–presents a recollected coalescence of that person’s appearances throughout his or her life.” We love the concept, and Sand’s execution is picture-perfect.

Via gregsand.net and Behance

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Light and shadow are among the fundamentals of photography. Barcelona-based photographer/art director Pol Úbeda Hervàs created this series of photos that puts his own shadow front and center, as the subject of this intriguing work. Hervàs explains that these pieces are about identity: “How can we accept that we are changing? How can we accept we hardly recognize ourselves in certain situations? I am changing at this very moment of my life. I do not react in the same ways I used to. I am surprised. Is that me? These pictures are the way I see myself now. My shadow is there but I erase myself because I don´t know who I am any longer. The shoes remain only to make sure there is something more than… a shadow.” This may seem like a rather cerebral concept to some, but it really is quite straightforward. And executed perfectly by Hervàs. Well done!

Via Flickr

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In honor of the fashionable social media practice of late, we are going to dip our toes in the “Throwback Thursday” pool….

Famed portrait photographer Philippe Halsman had a way with people, which certainly helped him build a body of iconic photography work. His conceptual approach to a medium that had been, up until then, largely used to capture reality was groundbreaking at the time. His collaboration in the late 1940s with surrealist artist Salvador Dali resulted in some of his most notable works. He later delved into perhaps his most famous series, Jump, in which he photographed movie stars, politicians, entertainers, artists, and authors to jump before his camera. In his own words, the late Halsman comments: “Starting in the early 1950s I asked every famous or important person I photographed to jump for me. I was motivated by a genuine curiosity. After all, life has taught us to control and disguise our facial expressions, but it has not taught us to control our jumps. I wanted to see famous people reveal in a jump their ambition or their lack of it, their self-importance or their insecurity, and many other traits.”

Via philippehalsman.com

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