Archives for posts with tag: concrete

The old adage goes, “beauty is in the eye of the beholder.” Munich-based photographer/artist Nick Frank’s series Farbraum, which translates from German to “color space”, is a look at otherwise mundane sights through the eyes of a gifted visual artist. In this terrific series, Frank literally extracts colors from these images, and brings them to the forefront in compelling new ways. Frank’s sense of color and composition are quite masterful. In his own words, Frank describes the project: “What is beauty? A rusty street lamp which has not lit up a road in a while. Buildings made out of prefabricated concrete in the middle of nowhere. Faded drainage pipes covered with rust and dust. Farbraum offers evidence that beauty is indeed in the eye of the beholder. Everyday objects perceived as ugly by society are suddenly moved into a new light by extracting colors – and even more: by leaching and overlapping colored accents of the motif it gains an additional dimension. The color stripes with the isolated main color and four secondary colors of the image finally show a greater variance within the image: the variance of depth. Objects turn tangible and vivid.”

Via nickfrank.de

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The shipping season has been hitting its peak over the past few days, so we thought it appropriate to share the typographic explorations of Barcelona-based design studio Lo Siento (previous post here). Among their highly creative undertakings are works in which they experiment with injecting colored liquid into individual pouches of plastic bubble wrap to form typographic figures. And these projects represent a larger theme in Lo Siento’s work: tangible typography. They are so in touch (no pun intended) with the nuances of letterforms, that they’re able to transfer that heightened awareness into physical objects, which is pretty astounding. We are sort of desensitized to design in some ways with advances in computer generated graphics, but when work like this comes along, it really catches our eye. Other works of Lo Siento’s include hand-formed muselet typography, cardboard typographic “skeleton”, and 4D letters, among many others. They are masters, and we really admire their work.

Via losiento.net

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When London-based designer Alexander Klement sets a personal design goal, he follows through in a big way. And his Lathe typeface is a shining example. As fellow designers, we understand that typeface design is no easy task. How do you create something fresh and new, when it has been done over and over in so many ways? Klement certainly created something we’ve never seen before. There’s great dimension to his figures, and we love how he explored various textures. Each character also stands quite nicely on its own. In his own words: “I decided not to design a typeface from scratch as there are so many great ones out there I could just add a personal touch to an existing one. I chose Futura as a base typeface for its simple, clean and modern characteristics. I started by creating a base generative extrusion which was applied to each character. Materials were then explored and applied to the characters to give a sense of a real life object.” Well done.

Via alexanderklement.co.uk

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