Archives for posts with tag: consumerism

Melbourne, Australia-based contemporary artist Ben Frost has a pop art aesthetic with a subversive, confrontational spirit. In some of his most recent work, Frost essentially uses mainly (junk) food and pharmaceutical packaging as a canvas for his bold illustrations inspired by pop culture, Roy Lichtenstein, and manga. His mashups are not random, though… Frost exhibits his mastery of juxtaposition with these works in a way that can be truly provocative. Through his work, Frost continually pushes boundaries and challenges social norms while addressing our advertising-soaked, consumer-obsessed culture. In his own statement, Frost describes: “By subverting mainstream iconography from the worlds of advertising, entertainment, and politics, he creates a visual framework that is bold, confronting and often controversial.”

Via benfrostisdead.com

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You may already be familiar with the work of contemporary American artist Scott Blake. Blake’s work is not only visually compelling, but also engaging and usually interactive. Some of his most prominent works involve bar codes (aptly called Barcode Art), which fittingly mock consumerism and the increasing societal dominance of big data. Blake has a clear love of technology, and uses it in incredible, sometimes controversial, ways. His “Chuck Close Filter” which emulated a technique made famous by the celebrated artist, for instance, was shut down by Close himself, citing jeopardy to his livelihood and trivializing his work. We are not even scratching the surface of Blake’s growing body of work, nor are we doing it much justice. Be sure to visit Blake’s site and take it all in first-hand.

Via barcodeart.com and YouTube

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London-based mixed media artist Nick Gentry, like many other creative individuals, creates artwork partly as a means to disseminate some sort of commentary. Gentry’s work is not only visually stunning, but also touches on the evolution of “consumerism, technology, identity and cyberculture in society, with a distinctive focus on obsolete media.” Gentry recycles such outdated media, like floppy disks and film negatives, and transforms them into arresting mosaics with layers of detail and nuance. And the details are not only aesthetic, but also in the media themselves, which once seemingly held a level of importance to their owners…  Gentry’s work could be seen as a mode of preservation, if you will. And he even engages viewers in his innovative “social” art by soliciting donations of otherwise discarded media. Brilliant.

Books available here.

Via nickgentry.com

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London design student Chris Godfrey’s twisted creation “All in One” serves as part of a dissertation on the ridiculous paradox presented by today’s age of consumerism: our general love of “quality” and “luxury” products, juxtaposed with our greater obsession with convenience. If you were to read this 12-course meal on a menu, you’d surely salivate. But Godfrey stuffs every course into a gelatinous mold that takes on the shape of the iconic tin can. Perhaps it’s best left for the quintessential foodie’s fallout shelter? Here’s what’s on the menu:

• Selection of local cheeses with sourdough bread
• Pickled kobe beef with charred strawberry
• Ricotta ravioli with a soft egg yolk
• Shitake mushroom topped with filled peppers
• Halibut poached in truffle butter in a coconut crepe
• Risotto foraged ramps, prosciutto and fresh parmesan
• French onion soup with fresh thyme and gruyere cheese
• Roast pork belly and celeriac root puree
• Palate cleanser, pear ginger juice
• Rib eye steak with grilled mustard greens
• Crack pie with milk ice cream on a vanilla tuile
• French canele with a malt barley and hazelnut latte

Via chrisgodfrey.me

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