Archives for posts with tag: convergence

As the convergence of our digital and physical lives continues at a rapid pace, art, as it historically has, reflects these shifts. UK-born, NYC-based designer/artist Ben Fearnley, whose award-winning work often features top-notch CGI, explores this juxtaposition through his recent personal project Sculptmojis. Fearnley’s visually engaging and playful CG creations mix traditional sculpture with those ubiquitous emojis we are all so familiar with. The contrast is striking, and honestly might not be as effective in less capable hands. Fearnley’s conceptual thinking and masterful execution elevate this digital art way beyond the very basic ideograms it derives from.

Via benfearnleydesign.com

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In his latest project, HI-RES, Madrid-based artist Rómulo Celdrán explores the convergence of digital art and fine art through sculpture. Celdrán’s analytical curiosity is especially intriguing for designers like us, who are constantly analyzing, consciously or subconsciously, the visual qualities of otherwise mundane objects all around us. These large-scale, visually arresting creations are really something. Not only is it compelling to look at three-dimensional pixelation before your eyes, but Celdrán uses these works to comment on the role 3D computer modeling now plays on visual perception. In his own words, Celdrán discusses the project: “Just as photography did with the two-dimensional still image and film did with the moving image, the current digital technologies that are used to generate 3D image models are revolutionizing the way we look at reality, understand it and relate to it. Whether it is the world of 3D scanning, photogrammetry, 3D design or any of their multiple forms and applications (technical, medico-scientific, recreational…) the 3D digital model shows us a reality beyond reality, a hyper-real reality.”

Via romuloceldran.com

We have long commented on the convergence of history and art. They are intrinsically intertwined, reliant on one another in many ways. So when an artist turns the documentation and storytelling aspect of said junction on its head, we surely take notice. For his series The American Revolution Revolution, Denver-based artist Shawn Huckins masterfully juxtaposes early American portraiture with social media jargon. Thoughtfully conceptualized and brilliantly executed, Huckins’s incredible work succeeds on so many levels. And it’s also important to note that these are physical paintings, should Huckins’s artistic ability ever come into question. Huckins is a superb American artist who is clearly inspired by American Neo-Classical painters, as well as more contemporary Pop artists. In his own words, Huckins explains the series: “The American Revolution was conceived through an exchange of a few well-formed ideas communicated in person and by handwritten letters. Imagine what George & Co. could have done with the Internet. Or not. Technology influences how much we know and what we believe, as well as how quickly and intelligently we convey our ideas. But does how we communicate govern the value of what we communicate? The physical act of typing very fast on small devices has undeniably impacted spelling, grammar, and punctuation, encouraging a degree of illiteracy that has become the new social norm. As goes our grammatical literacy, do our social and cultural literacies follow?”

Via shawnhuckins.com

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