Archives for posts with tag: creatures

We are the first to admit that snakes in the wild and snakes in a controlled setting like a zoo, or through the lens of a talented photographer are two entirely different experiences. We certainly don’t love snakes in the way some people have them as pets. But we do recognize their undeniable beauty and mystique, especially when Italian photographer Guido Mocafico is involved. For his book Serpens, published several years ago, Mocafico captured a variety of snakes, including vipers and cobras, in these stunning photos. We have always found the vivid colors, remarkable patterns and graceful movements of these creatures beautiful and creatively inspiring. Mocafico shares a similar sentiment: “I have always been terrified by these reptiles, but I also find them terribly fascinating. I felt a sort of repulsion-attraction for these living creatures…. If I had to define beauty, I’d say it has to contain an element of darkness or danger.”

Via guidomocafico.com and hamiltonsgallery.com

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Animal photography is often seen as cute and sometimes kitschy (and we have featured such works, which we feel do have a place). But London-based photographer Tim Flach takes an entirely different approach. Using principles of human portraiture, Flach’s highly conceptual work is informed by his concerns with anthropomorphism and anthropocentrism. Directly from his artist’s statement, Flach says his “interests lie in the way humans shape animals, and shape their meaning. Whether genetically, as with the featherless chicken, or with the symbolism that gives a special significance to a dove but dismisses a London pigeon as a flying rat. His images aim to promote discussion and encourage debate.” While there is clearly a cerebral mission at work here, we cannot dismiss the artistic value. Flach presents his animal subjects in unusual ways that genuinely engage the viewer. We love the intimacy he achieves, and the studio setting really brings the subjects forth. There should be no debate about how incredible Flach’s work is.

Via timflach.com

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