Archives for posts with tag: Darth Vader

Sure, we’ve seen paper cut art before (here and here and here), and we’re very fond of it, by the way. But we’ve never seen anything quite like this. London-based artist/photographer Rich McCor (otherwise known as @paperboyo) brilliantly pairs his paper cut skills with his keen eye for photography. And the results are clever, playful and unexpected. McCor’s carefully crafted silhouettes are brought to life against sometimes familiar and iconic backdrops. While his work may seem simple in concept, there’s no doubt in our minds that these smart compositions require much more skill than one may think. Needless to say, we are thoroughly impressed and inspired. And his growing base of 175,000 Instagram followers would surely agree.

Via Instagram

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Initially drawn in by typographic papercraft, we quickly realized the portfolio of Lobulo was a treasure trove if dynamic designs. Splitting time between London and Barcelona, Lobulo Design is actually just one man: Javier Rodríguez García. His penchant for working with paper has gained him much respect, and even a viral following online. The well-produced short videos he posts on social media give a nice behind-the-scenes glimpse at Lobule in action, feeding that central hunger for all-access documentation (see some below). The intricacy of Lobulo’s work is striking, and his sense of color and space outstanding. We especially appreciate work that is outside of our comfort zone, and this certainly falls into that category. Just awesome.

Via lobulodesign.com

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Young Polish designer/photographer Paweł Kadysz has a thing for so called 365 projects, where he publishes a photo each day for a year (or similarly long stretch of time). In fact, Kadysz is so taken with these long-term, discipline-demanding projects, that he launched a web platform dedicated to their very existence called “tookapic”. While they require a certain amount of commitment, these daily photo projects are touted by Kadysz as a great way to break out of one’s comfort zone and really grow as a photographer. He even describes the sensation of being “addicted” to his camera and daily photo taking. Kadysz’s latest project, The Daily Life of Darth Vader, is timely not only for its subject, none other than the Sith Lord himself, one Mister D. Vader, but also for its feeding of our cultural obsession with a glimpse into the everyday life of public figures. Granted, this is a fictional character, but it still plays on that collective fixation. Not quite a year, but rather 60 days, Kadysz’s Darth Vader project ended with the premiere of Episode VII, and garnered lots of buzz. Oh, and did we mention that the entire collection is basically a series of selfies by way of a self-timer. Awesome achievement anyway you slice it.

Via tookapic

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Most designers know that sometimes in order to really grab an audience’s attention, you need to be edgy, perhaps even controversial. This notion is not lost on Brazilian-born, Hamburg, Germany-based art director Felipe Nunes Franco. His refreshingly unexpected approach to soliciting something as virtuous as organ donation, of all things, is both tongue-in-cheek and thought provoking. For his series, Everyone Has Something Good, Franco skillfully illustrates how even notorious bad guys, both real and fictional, literally have good hearts. Franco’s subjects include Bin Laden, Hitler, Darth Vader and (wait for it) Justin Bieber! Given the sad state of the world, this series could really be ongoing. We’d love to see more!

Via Tumblr

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Exercises in typographic and mosaic compositions bring us back to our early studies as designers. Not because they are novice or effortless, but because they touch on the fundamentals of good design. Italian artist/designer known as Antonio Village9991 is quite adept at both, as exhibited by this sampling of his impressive body of work. For almost twenty years, Antonio has been creating these digital compositions that are much more difficult than they may look. It takes an acute sense of space and a savvy discernment of color to engineer these beautifully intricate pieces. Antonio’s work lends itself to multiple viewing distances… truly incredible details up close, with the larger image emerging the further away you move. Some may rely on complex algorithms to accomplish this, but what makes Antonio’s work so special is that it comes from his creative thought processes and keen attention to detail. One word: wow!

More mosaics here and here and here.

Via village9991.it and Behance

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It’s not often that we, the general public, are exposed to the ancestry of superheroes and other fictional characters. Stories of family roots have sometimes been depicted on the pages of comic books and graphic novels, and briefly on film. But Italian photography duo Carlo Marvellini and Andrea Marvellini, otherwise known as Foto Marvellini, have documented their heritage through some very impressive “historical” portraits. We are really taken with the authenticity of their work… well done. In their own words: “The historical company “Foto Marvellini – Milano” was founded when photography was born. As their old motto used to say, the Marvellini brothers performed “Portraits for everyone. Even for those who don’t want to be portrayed”. Through the generations Marvellini’s historical grew higher, becoming a great gallery of phantomatic characters. Hidden until today, this precious collection is now spread all over the world, as Andrea and Carlo Marvellini, the last heirs, desired.”

Another “historical” post here.

Via fotomarvellini.com and Facebook

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It seems as if we are currently in the golden age of superheroes, at least if the release of major motion pictures is a gauge. These characters seem so pervasive in popular culture today, not just in the US but worldwide, that inspired works of art are almost inevitable. French photographer Sacha Goldberger really raises the bar with his phenomenal series Super Flemish. Goldberger uses not only superheroes, but also science-fiction and a few other characters from popular fantasies, and poses some intriguing questions: What if Superman was born in the sixteenth century? What if the Hulk was a Duke? How might Van Eyck have portrayed Snow White? And he answers them beautifully in this mashup of modern day superheroes, Flemish painting techniques and Elizabethan-era fashion. These works are really quite exquisite, and certainly thought-provoking. Well done, Mr. Goldberger!

This series is slightly reminiscent of work by British artist Steve Payne. More superhero related posts here and here and here.

Via sachabada.com

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Japanese artist simply known as Makaon creates these phenomenal figures from cans. The details achieved here are really something to see. We love when artists use random objects as art, and Makaon’s work is right up there. Can we get some of these for our desks, please?

Via Makaon’s site

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