Archives for posts with tag: death

With one of his latest masterpieces, Wreck, Brooklyn-based sculptor/artist Jordan Griska beautifully juxtaposes opulence and misfortune in a truly provocative way. Painstakingly crafted from over 12,000 individual pieces of mirror-finish stainless steel over the course of almost two years, Griska’s Wreck tells the story of a (life-size) Mercedes-Benz S550 involved in a fatality wreck. We are absolutely in awe of this piece, and Griska multi-disciplinary approach, from 3D modeling technology, engineering proficiency, precision laser cutting and good old fashioned hand assembly. Not only is this fascinating sculpture beautiful, but it also evokes very relevant and stimulating sociopolitical concepts surrounding wealth and debauchery. Griska says it best: “The perfect geometry and flawless materiality of the piece reflect the inspiration of idealized digital design, in stark contrast with the grimness of the reality it represents. Beauty, technology and engineering collide with death and reality.”

Via jordangriska.com

Jordan Griska's Wreck on view at Pier 9 today till Sunday, 11 – 7. Across from @fringearts #pcwreck

A post shared by Philadelphia Contemporary (@philadelphiacontemporary) on

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Ah, spring is (finally) in the air. A time-honored tradition for many, decorating eggs, is taken to a whole other level by truly skilled artists (here and here). Brooklyn-based tattoo artist turned fine artist Scott Campbell is among said artists, innovating egg decoration even further. In fact, “decoration” is probably much too casual a term… this is art. Campbell uses his exceptional illustration skills to produce graphite drawings inside ostrich eggshells. Mind blowing, we know. The intricacy of his work, and sheer beauty of his compositions, on what we can only imagine to be a rather trying surface, is awe-inspiring. Campbell’s subject matter of choice, not only with his eggshell art but throughout his body of work, focuses on the visual juxtaposition of life and death. Needless to say, we are absolutely taken with his work.

Via scottcampbellstudio.com and marcjancou.com and Instagram

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Photographs frequently serve as links to the past, often summoning up memories of a time that came before. Tennessee-based photographer Greg Sand capitalizes on this association, which is fundamental to his philosophy as an artist. In his own words, Sand says: “My work is about memory, the passage of time, mortality and the photograph’s role in shaping our experience of loss. Photography’s unique ability to capture a fleeting moment allows it to expose the temporality of life.” In his series entitled Remnants, Sand creates stunning works composed of three found photos from different times in the subject’s past, cut into strips and skillfully woven together to form a sort of cloth-like composite portrait. Sand says of woven cloth as a metaphor for memory: “As Peter Stallybrass writes in Worn Worlds, ‘The magic of cloth is that it receives us: receives our smells, our sweat, our shape even.’ This is one of the marvels of memory as well: we perceive each moment in our lives; these are eventually woven together to form our memory. Each piece in this series creates a likeness of an individual that–rather than depicting an accurate visual representation of that person at any given time–presents a recollected coalescence of that person’s appearances throughout his or her life.” We love the concept, and Sand’s execution is picture-perfect.

Via gregsand.net and Behance

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A quick shoutout to one of out favorite graffiti artists around, ROA. It’s been a while since we posted (here) about this wildly talented Belgian artist. His signature black and white large-scale works featuring animals, often of the scavenger variety, are visually arresting. Some find ROA’s work grotesque, but he cites his fascination with the circle of life, and the beauty in the rhythm of life and death, as his inspiration. We are particularly taken with his imaginative use of space (lenticular rabbit!), and how that advances his art to another level, as exhibited in the particular works below. Be sure to check out the video too. And look out for ROA’s work near you… our Rochester studio has the distinct privilege of being just a mile and a half from one of his murals.

Via Flickr

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Spanish art director Rafael Quilez of McCann Erickson in Madrid created this award-winning print campaign for a hospital cardiology department. It’s a shame the campaign is so specific, because the concept — that poor choices and bad habits cause more deaths than natural catastrophes, severe accidents, and even war – seems to be an important one to expose to the masses. And Quilez’s execution is right on the money. Bravo, really well done.

Via cargocollective.com

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Australian illustrator Ben Brown clearly has an obsession with skulls and bones. So this compelling series, Die Young, should come as no surprise to those who know his work. It’s certainly part morbidly ironic, but also an eternal salute to these high-profile celebrities who suffered untimely deaths. As Brown puts it… “the celebrity lifestyle that we seem to aspire to, had killed them all by the age of 27?” His bold illustrative style is really striking, and the macabre subject matter makes all the more intriguing.

Via benbrown.com.au

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