Archives for posts with tag: designer

Oh, experimental typography… how we love thee. Perhaps it’s a case of design envy, or we’re just taken with pretty things in general, but when done well, experimental typography can stand on its own, out of context. This is definitely the case with the work of Hamburg, Germany-based motion designer/illustrator Alex Schlegel. Schlegel’s visual explorations on the typographic treatment for DirecTV’s Super Saturday Night lead to these impressive pieces. The forms, lighting, and textures achieved with Maxon Cinema 4D are not only purposeful but also beautiful. Designers can sometimes use such powerful tools gratuitously, but Schlegel’s steady hand and keen eye for composition and color elevate this client job for corporate giant AT&T to works of art.

Via Behance

Minimalism is often just the right treatment for getting to the essence of a visual identity (previous examples here and here and here). And that is precisely the case with Minneapolis-based designer/art director Tony Buckland’s project, Birds of Minnesota. You don’t have to be into ornithology or bird watching to appreciate this work, there’s an aesthetic appeal that stands on its own. Buckland’s objective is to “edit the defining characteristics of each bird down to the absolute minimum without losing the essence of the bird.” And he achieves that brilliantly. An ever-growing collection of prints available here.

Via birdsofminnesota.com

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Serial projects, that is, ones that are repeated at daily intervals for a set period of time, are really an exemplification of self discipline and ferocious creativity. One such example is a project called 100 Hoopties by Detroit-bred, Los Angeles-based designer and cyclist Jenny Beatty. While completing a masters program at SVA in NYC, Beatty spent one hundred consecutive days immersed in her two loves: design and cycling. Beatty exercised her stellar design skills and unending creativity while reimagining iconic pieces of artwork using only scrapped bicycle parts. In her own words, “The idea came about very serendipitously. I was living above a bike shop that was going out of business, and would walk past coming home every night to a sidewalk filled with left over “junk”. One day I came across a pretty much new set of mustache handlebars with butchers basket and snapped the gem up for future use. The bars/basket sat on my landing for the next 5 months – taunting me to do something with them. When the time came to submit our ideas for 100 days – I tried to think of something that would summarize my life of cyclist and graphic designer. As I was writing out my thoughts, I kept trying to find ways to use this basket and handlebars but it wasn’t until I started thinking about taking it apart that the magic happened.” Magical, indeed. Here are a few of our favorites.

More serial projects here and here and here.

Via 100hoopties.com

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Make no mistake, the captivating portfolio of Thailand-born, Sydney, Australia-based photographer/designer Peechaya Burroughs is no child’s play. Though her work is certainly whimsical and intrinsically approachable, it boasts no less artistic merit than fine art of a different nature. Burroughs’s minimalist approach to mostly hand-manipulated works is striking in a vast ocean of tricked out Photoshop work (which has merit in its own right, but the work of Burroughs is sort of refreshing in some ways). In her own words, Burroughs explains: “My photographs mainly consist of things that I create or manipulate by hand. Occasionally I use Photoshop when enhancing the idea and presentation of an image fits well. Driven by childhood memories and very much fascinated by children’s imagination and their quirkiness, the direction of my photography is light, easy to approach with a little touch of everyday optimism.”

Via peechayaburroughs.com and Instagram

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Romania-born, New York City-based illustrator/designer/art director Daniel Nyari employs a distinct style of bulbous shapes and bold colors in a geometric and cubist sort of way. And we love it, as do his impressive roster of clients, which includes ESPN, Wired, GQ, Adidas, National Geographic, Microsoft, Men’s Health, among others. Nyari says he wants “to make art that looks like it was made by a computer which thinks it’s human.” His process is methodical and based on a grid, and this thoughtfulness shows. Nyari’s body of work is comprised of a great deal of football (soccer) projects, which is clearly a passion, and derives naturally from his European roots. But make no mistake, this is not a hobby for Nyari. He’s a terrific illustrator who has found his way and is making his mark in a crowded landscape of creatives.

Via iamdany.com

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In keeping with our (hopefully) weeklong theme of Create Upstate 2015 (other posts here and here), we turn the spotlight on fellow Rochester-based designer (and educator/writer) Mitch Goldstein. Those behind the planning of Create Upstate clearly made a deliberate decision to have Goldstein kick off the main event. Goldstein is the perfect blend of adept designer and engaging speaker, and his talk about The Habit of Making got us charged up right out of the box. It almost felt like church for designers, and Goldstein was giving a homily. In essence, Goldstein discussed his habit of making for the sake of making, and how it has made him a better designer. This daily 30-minute creative exercise, which he and his wife Anne Jordan call “inside walking”, has given way to some pretty impressive work (below and here). Goldstein stressed the importance of letting go, and not worrying about making something “good” or even “finished”, but just focus on the making part. We are not really doing Goldstein’s sermon any justice here, just know that this is sage advice that we hope to get into the habit of following. Be sure to scroll down for products from Goldstein’s “walks”, and a sampling of his superb client work, some of which originated directly from said walks.

Via mitchgoldstein.com and Tumblr

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Continuing the theme of our fantastic experience at Create Upstate last week in Syracuse (previous post here), we’d like to introduce you to Curtis Canham of CSA Creative Studio. Canham is an art director/designer/educator based in the Albany area with an impressive and diverse portfolio, from sophisticated packaging to illustration-driven infographics to consumer-facing web design. Along with running a full service design studio, Canham also finds the time to educate the next generation of designers as a design professor at The Center for Art and Design at The College of Saint Rose in Albany. With all of this important work, Canham, believe it or not, is also working on publishing a fundamental typography book. Busy guy, indeed. Last week, Canham ran a table in the marketplace at Create Upstate extolling the virtues of a-holes that quickly caught our attention. A-holes? What the what!? Canham drew us in with his impassioned discourse about his forthcoming book, A-holes: A Type Book. He enlightened us on such things as the anatomy of a-holes, historic a-holes, famous a-holes. and families of a-holes. All of this perceived potty talk may elicit gasps from those who don’t know any better. But being the typography nerds that we are, we, of course, understand and appreciate the double entendre. Aside from the obvious, an a-hole is also the negative space, or counter, within the “A” characters. Canham’s book taps right into a brand of humor we Barbour folk love. With only 5 days left, Canham is in the home stretch of a Kickstarter campaign to fund a first printing of his 130-page book. Don’t be an a-hole… pledge a few bucks, please.

Via csacreativestudio.com and Kickstarter

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Gabe was particularly taken with all of this, and his name was fittingly drawn for an A-hole t-shirt at Create Upstate! In his own words, “you are what you wear.” Bahahahahaha!

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The worlds of fine art and digital art seem to be very slowly converging. There was a time not long ago when Photoshop “art” did not even exist, and traditional artists and art enthusiasts would have shuddered at even the thought. But technological advances, and out-of-the-box thinking have given rise to digitally produced works that are more than computer generated, but thoughtfully composed using time-honored techniques. Los Angeles-based digital artist and designer Anthony Gargasz is one such artist whose work seems to rise above. Gargasz’s thought-provoking series Metallic Faces takes an organic human form, and imposes mechanical attributes, with great effect, color and contrast. Fine, indeed.

Via anthonygargasz.com

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There are few joys in life greater than creating something for your child, especially when you’re in the business of creating. San Fransisco-based designer/illustrator Kyson Dana tapped into that very happiness when he and fellow illustrator Jeffery Smith challenged each other to a sketching duel (think Type Fight). After 26 days, Dana knew he would have a special alphabet of animals to share with his young son. The premise was simple, but the execution was quite challenging (and inspiring). In his own words, Dana describes the project: “The rules for the competition were that we had to draw one animal per day and post it to Instagram by midnight. The animal had to start with the letter of the day and the composition could be created using any medium. We made our way through the alphabet beginning with the letter ‘A’ for a full 26 days and never missed a sketch. The pressure of producing a solid sketch grew more and more with each day and we saw our standard for what we posted slowly rise with each new day as well. Finally after 26 days we ended the duel with a bunch of sketches and more than 1,500 new Instagram followers to show for it.” This is just a sampling of Dana’s sketches. Be sure to also check out his outstanding portfolio.

Via kysondana.com and Instagram

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We love 3D work that is done thoughtfully and with purpose. And we also have a certain fondness for serial work… that is, work that is part of a series. This terrific set of numbers by Hamburg, Germany-based art director/designer/CGI artist Antoni Tudisco (along with Bucharest-based Andrei Brovcenco) certainly fits the bill. Commissioned by the Financial Times luxury lifestyle magazine, How To Spend It, these numeric characters are expertly constructed in a 3D universe to represent a variety of luxurious goods, including jewelry, gems, precious metals, plush fabrics, floral arrangements, upscale furniture, and even a sailboat. Thanks to incredible advances in 3D technology, and certainly the remarkable talents of Tudisco, the realism achieved here is phenomenal. Nicely done.

Via Behance

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