Archives for posts with tag: detailed

Some of the most moving pieces of art involve the human form. After all, everyone on the planet can relate in some capacity… we are all human. Nature is also an ever-present theme, and artists sometimes explore the relationship between the two. Which is exactly the case for the work of Virginia-based sculptor Christopher David White. But what is really intriguing about White’s incredible body of work is his ability to manipulate perception… in essence, his mastery of illusion (or in art-speak, trompe l’oeil, visual illusion in art, which literally translates to “deceives the eye” from French). Upon inspection, White’s work appears to be intricately sculpted from petrified wood. We might add, if these pieces were sculpted from wood, that would be impressive in and of itself. But these stunning sculptures are actually rendered from clay with an astounding attention to detail. At its core, White’s work is about change. In his own words: “Change is a constant reminder that permanence is the ultimate illusion. It is through the creation of hyper-realistic sculpture that I explore the relationship between nature, man, and the phenomenon of impermanence.”

Via christopherdavidwhite.com

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Playing with one’s food is a favorite pastime for many. Few carry that over into adulthood, but we certainly appreciate when artists take food to another level (here and here and here). So when we came across the work of this Russian art duo, we just had to share. Food stylist Tatiana Shkondina and photographer Sasha Tivanov collaborated to recreate famous paintings… using food, and they really nailed them. Their attention to detail is just incredible. Their love of both food and art is clear. Just as food tastes better when it’s “made with love”, the same applies to art, in our estimation. Shkondina and Tivanov love what they do, and it shows.

Via Behance

British artist Nick Smith speaks the visual language of a true contemporary artist. His work is thoughtful, compelling and current. Seemingly inspired by 8-bit graphics of his youth, Smith recreates recognizable paintings from a variety of famous artists using little more than a brilliant sense of color and some custom Pantone Color Chips. Though the work he’s recreating employs broad ranges of color and is often very detailed, his pixelated reinterpretations are still remarkably recognizable. True to Smith’s attention to detail, he does not use standard Pantone chips, but rather customizes them with specific names that relate to the artwork they comprise, adding another layer of dimension to these already impressive works.

More pixelated work here and here and here.

Via smithandstuff.com and Instagram

In honor of National Coffee Day, we thought it fitting to showcase an artist who (subtly) uses the magical brown elixir to make art. Maui-based mixed-media artist Alessandra Maria creates beautifully detailed, dark and delicate portraits using little more than a pencil, black ink and gold leaf on coffee-stained paper. Inspired by Austrian symbolist painter Gustav Klimt, Maria’s haunting life-like portraits evoke fantasy and mystery with intricate details set on an eerily enigmatic surface achieved through the coffee’s dark brown grounds. There are even religious overtones in these thought-provoking masterpieces. Maria’s work is simply beautiful and poignant.

Via alessandramaria.com

It’s true that we’ve seen our fair share of movie posters through the years (here, here and here), but nothing quite like these. Manchester, UK-based designer/photographer/poster artist Jordan Bolton doesn’t rely on highly stylized shots from the film, or even the film’s actors. No effects-laden titles or much typography to speak of at all. Instead, for his Objects series, Bolton meticulously arranges prop elements from each film, paying careful attention to color palettes and composition to relay the film’s themes. For his Rooms series, Bolton applies that same attention to detail, focusing instead on recreating floor plans from keys scenes in the films. We cannot imagine how much close watching of these films Bolton does to be able to create these works. This is a true cinephile’s dream, and lucky for them Bolton sells prints here and here.

Via Tumblr and Facebook

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We’ve seen art created from a wide variety of media, but nothing quite like this. As a matter of fact, if you had to guess how these were created just by looking at them, you’d probably have a hard time figuring it out. Relying on little more than brown packing tape, an Xacto and the filtering of light behind a translucent surface, Amsterdam-based artist Max Zorn’s work is awe-inspiring. The nuance in shading he achieves by layering tape is astounding all on its own. Never mind Zorn’s ability to manipulate the tape so intricately. It’s interesting how these works, composed of such an unexpected and artless material, are so beautiful. Zorn clearly has a penchant for the past, as indicated by his choice of subjects for the majority of his work. Interestingly, Zorn’s fondness for packing tape began as street art, as he describes in his own words: “There’s a lot of great street art by day, but it disappears after dark. I wanted to come up with urban art that uses nighttime as a setting, and there was nothing more inviting than the street lamps in Amsterdam. In the beginning I used packing tape to fill in larger sections of my marker drawings. Once I hung them on street lamps, the light’s effect opened up new ideas with ditching markers and just using tape.”

Via maxzorn.com and YouTube

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With financial matters on the minds of many around the world on the heals of our historic presidential election just one week ago, we thought it fitting to share this project by Georgian illustrator/designer Tatiana Trikoz. Commissioned by Swiss banking group Swissquote, Trikoz created these incredibly intricate currency portraits featuring some of the world’s most famous billionaires – Mark Zuckerberg, Richard Branson and Elon Musk. Trikoz seamlessly adheres to the look of the existing currency she aims to mimic… we are in awe of the stunning details. Perhaps our president-elect will commission her to imagine his likeness on U.S. currency in the near future? Crazier things have happened….

Via Behance

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The (fleeting) art of pumpkin carving has certainly grown in popularity in recent years, partly due to increased exposure on social media, plus the rise of competitive television programs like Food Network’s Halloween Wars. Once called “the Picasso of Pumpkin Carving”, Arizona-based artist Ray Villafane finds himself in peak pumpkin season on this October 31, so we thought it fitting to take a look at his awe-inspiring work. Villafane, who naturally competed on Halloween Wars in its debut season back in 2011, is one of the most high-profile pumpkin carvers around, and for good reason. His work in a medium that is unfortunately very temporary is incredible on so many levels. From concept to execution, Villafane’s creations go well beyond the ubiquitous jack-o-lantern. In the hands of Villafane and company (collectively called Villafane Studios), these ghoulish gourds come to life with remarkable details and truly lifelike expression. We dare you to peruse through these few examples of his extraordinary work without an expression of utter wonderment and admiration. More spine-chilling posts here and here and here. Happy Halloween!

Via villafanestudios.com and Facebook

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We feel one of our fundamental responsibilities as designers is to employ our creative resources to help communicate and disseminate messages for public good, when possible. The right visuals can be powerful and in this instance, also quite beautiful. Commissioned by German environmental advocacy group Robin Wood, ad agency Grabarz & Partner collaborated with some clearly talented folks from Berlin to Bangkok to create this compelling series of advertisements illustrating the destruction of nature and wildlife around the world. Anchored by a clever concept, the execution here is spot-on. With the use of double exposure (other examples here and here), these compelling ads feature an animal and its natural habitat threatened by destruction. We love the composition and endless details of each piece. Just excellent all around.

Via Behance

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In an effort to come full circle in recognizing the very polarizing Common Core testing in New York over the past two weeks, we bring you another “math meets art” post. This time it’s the work of Venezuelan architect and illustrator Rafael Araujo, and his very technical approach to capturing the mathematical brilliance of nature. With simple drafting tools (pencil, ruler, compass, protractor), Araujo takes much pleasure and pride being unplugged from technology while exploring three dimensionality (yes, without the aid of a computer), which can take up to 100 hours to create a single complex composition. We cannot wrap our brains around how one would even begin to approach this, so needless to say, we are in complete awe of Araujo. As are the thousands of backers who contributed to his Kickstarter campaign to publish a book of his work, which began several months ago with a goal just over $20,000. Araujo has since raised over a quarter of a million dollars to date, with the help of Sydney, Australia-based husband and wife team Melinda and Andres Restrepo. The Restrepos were so taken with Araujo’s work online, they approached him about creating a book. Capitalizing on the growing popularity of “adult coloring books” (c’mon, not X-rated, but those touting supposed “stress relieving” patterns), the project to publish the Golden Ratio Coloring Book is forging ahead. When you look at the sampling of Araujo’s work below, just keep in mind that they are all done by hand. Simply breathtaking.

Via rafael-araujo.com

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