Archives for posts with tag: digital manipulation

Photo manipulation, we’re talking done really well, is a skill unto itself. With the proliferation of Photoshop use, the average viewer seems to take manipulated photos for granted these days. Photo manipulation software is literally everywhere, including on cheap or even free apps on phones in people’s pockets. But the upper crust of Photoshop users still have it on lockdown, and we take notice when we see greatness. Enter Australia-based photographer/designer Anthony Hearsey. He takes on a variety of clients and projects, but it’s these beautifully surreal images that caught our attention. Hearsey’s work is seamless, allowing his twisted concepts to really shine. We will surely continue to follow him and look forward to seeing what he comes up with next.

Via Behance

hearsey-01 hearsey-02 hearsey-03 hearsey-04 hearsey-05 hearsey-06 hearsey-07 hearsey-08 hearsey-09 hearsey-10 hearsey-11

It wasn’t long ago we featured the work of Hungarian photographer/artist Flora Borsi. Once again, Borsi brings a certain edginess to the art of digital manipulation. While retouching can sometimes be seen as gratuitous, Borsi elevates photo-manipulation to an art form. Her work is both thoughtful and thought-provoking. In her latest series of self-portraits she calls Animeyed, Borsi poses with animals in such a way that they seem to share an eye. Her work has an interesting way of coming across as playful, but also slightly uncomfortable at the same time. Creative, clever and captivating. Once again, we love it.

Via floraborsi.com

Borsi-01 Borsi-02 Borsi-03 Borsi-04 Borsi-05 Borsi-06

With the proliferation of digital photography, pared with editing software like Photoshop, photo retouching is basically the norm these days. There has certainly been some controversy (good example here) surrounding the practice, especially when it comes to the issue of misrepresentation. Hungarian photographer/artist Flora Borsi specializes in digital manipulation, but with surprising effect that can even be described as unnerving. Turning retouching on its head, with her project Stockify, Borsi’s work clearly finds inspiration from legendary surrealist painters that came before her, most notably Picasso and Dali. Borsi brings the fundamentals of surrealist artwork, particularly unexpected juxtapositions, to the digital age with this arresting series. In her own words, “In this project I’ve been analyzing some fashion portraits, how perfect they are. So I made the opposite of retouching, somehow I distouched these pictures of perfect models. This project is connected to surrealist painters point of view: beauty wasn’t enough to give me interest. I love imperfections as much as I love surrealism. These pictures are my little monsters, no one wants to look like them, because they are totally unique.”

Via floraborsi.com

Borsi-01 Borsi-02 Borsi-03 Borsi-04 Borsi-05 Borsi-06

Disney characters are often the subject of artwork in this particularly pop culture-centric moment in time (here and here and here), so it’s no surprise that someone has envisioned what Disney royalty might look like in “real life”. And that someone is Melbourne, Australia-based Finnish designer/illustrator/art director/photo manipulator Jirka Vinse Jonatan Väätäinen. The rise of live-action Disney fairytail movies in recent years has certainly increased public consciousness about these beloved characters, but Väätäinen depicts a much wider variety with astounding results. Gathering an assortment of photos online, Väätäinen digitally blends them together and manipulates them in such a way that looks natural and realistic. It’s an interpretation, of course, but pretty spot-on in our opinion. His work has been floating around the internet for years, and his newly released set of princes has regenerated interest in his excellent work. Just a sampling here, so be sure to check out Väätäinen’s site for the full collection. Magical, indeed.

Via jirkavinse.com

Vaatainen-01 Vaatainen-02 Vaatainen-03 Vaatainen-04 Vaatainen-05 Vaatainen-06 Vaatainen-07 Vaatainen-08 Vaatainen-09 Vaatainen-10 Vaatainen-11 Vaatainen-12

Done well, photo manipulation can stop you in your tracks. Advances in software technology, particularly Photoshop, have allowed artists to explore surreal scenarios, once restricted to visions inside one’s head, like never before. The cultural and artistic movement known as surrealism began in the early 1920s, and arguably continues today to some degree, with the rise of said technological advances. One such artist engaging in making art that blurs the lines between dream and reality is Mumbai-based Anil Saxena. Saxena is particularly adept at Photoshop, and has a playful sort of style, but does not utilize his skills haphazardly. He creates thoughtful work, and is extremely detail oriented. In his own words, Saxena says “If the image is a success but my work goes unnoticed, I’m doing my job well.” We couldn’t agree more.

More current surrealist art here and here and here.

Via Behance

Saxena-02 Saxena-03Saxena-01 Saxena-04 Saxena-05 Saxena-06 Saxena-07 Saxena-08 Saxena-09 Saxena-10 Saxena-11 Saxena-12 Saxena-13 Saxena-14

What the…!? The unbelievable work of UK designer/illustrator Chris LaBrooy (previously featured here) elicits confusion, amazement and delight all at the same time. LaBrooy’s tremendously realistic (yet highly unlikely) 3D creations are nothing short of spectacular. We are particularly taken with his automobile works, which appropriately feature the words “aerobics” and “elasticity” in their titles… words obviously not associated with rigid metal motor vehicles, but perfectly normal in this twisted alter universe. LaBrooy takes digital manipulation to a whole other level, bending and stretching familiar objects with such precision. We absolutely love what LaBrooy is doing, and look forward to his future work.

Via chrislabrooy.com

LaBrooy-01 LaBrooy-02 LaBrooy-03 LaBrooy-04 LaBrooy-05 LaBrooy-06 LaBrooy-07 LaBrooy-08 LaBrooy-09 LaBrooy-10 LaBrooy-11 LaBrooy-12 LaBrooy-13 LaBrooy-14 LaBrooy-15 LaBrooy-16 LaBrooy-17

%d bloggers like this: