Archives for posts with tag: experimental typography

Our penchant for serial works never diminishes. There’s just something about the natural order of things that is so satisfying. Glasgow-based illustrator/designer Jack Daly taps into that systemization while exploring his love of illustration, typography, and travel with his aptly titled Wanderlust Alphabet. And we have to say, the results, so far, are pretty great. It goes without saying that Daly is a terrific artist, and his adept use of color and sense of composition really make each of these pieces sing. Having just tackled the very beginning of the alphabet so far, Daly differentiates each letter/city with signature landmarks, architecture, local customs, etc. We are really taken with Daly’s style and cannot wait to see this alphabet grow. The possibilities are endless! In the meantime, prints available here.

Via Behance and Instagram

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Oh, experimental typography… how we love thee. Perhaps it’s a case of design envy, or we’re just taken with pretty things in general, but when done well, experimental typography can stand on its own, out of context. This is definitely the case with the work of Hamburg, Germany-based motion designer/illustrator Alex Schlegel. Schlegel’s visual explorations on the typographic treatment for DirecTV’s Super Saturday Night lead to these impressive pieces. The forms, lighting, and textures achieved with Maxon Cinema 4D are not only purposeful but also beautiful. Designers can sometimes use such powerful tools gratuitously, but Schlegel’s steady hand and keen eye for composition and color elevate this client job for corporate giant AT&T to works of art.

Via Behance

You must admit, the “pumpkin spice” phenomenon that has taken over in recent years may be getting bit out of hand. We find premature pumpkin spicing particularly offensive (as does this guy)… we do not need pumpkin spiced anything in August! In any case, with the autumnal flavors creeping in, so do all the colors, textures and visuals of the season. We love food-related typography (here and here and here), so when UK designer Daniel Coleman pulled back the curtain on his process for this fittingly delicious take on pumpkin spiced typography, we were immediately intrigued. In his own words, Coleman discusses the project: “Esquires’ Pumpkin Spice Latte is the coffee chain’s hero product for Autumn 2016. We were asked to produce a key visual that captured the Esquires brand points of being artisan and handmade, whilst conveying the products ingredients as authentic (and not just a syrup shot). We designed a visual that captured those standpoints, with a particular focus on the authentic ingredients. By creating the type out of cinnamon, we could emphasise the flavour in the latte. To further set the mood, we added leaves and key ingredients around the typography. We experimented with various ingredients, looking at what gave the greatest clarity, colour and perception of flavour. Given the nature of the product we decided to work with cinnamon. The type was created by adjusting a font named ‘Beyond the Mountains’, making sure it had no complete bowls, eyes or loops. The next step was to laser cut it out onto card to create our stencil. The final result took a few experiments, using varying amounts of cinnamon to ensure the best detail and legibility.”

Via Behance

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The shipping season has been hitting its peak over the past few days, so we thought it appropriate to share the typographic explorations of Barcelona-based design studio Lo Siento (previous post here). Among their highly creative undertakings are works in which they experiment with injecting colored liquid into individual pouches of plastic bubble wrap to form typographic figures. And these projects represent a larger theme in Lo Siento’s work: tangible typography. They are so in touch (no pun intended) with the nuances of letterforms, that they’re able to transfer that heightened awareness into physical objects, which is pretty astounding. We are sort of desensitized to design in some ways with advances in computer generated graphics, but when work like this comes along, it really catches our eye. Other works of Lo Siento’s include hand-formed muselet typography, cardboard typographic “skeleton”, and 4D letters, among many others. They are masters, and we really admire their work.

Via losiento.net

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Let’s be honest here, food and typography are two of our favorite things. So when the two are paired with great skill, we take notice. This well-executed poster by Russian art director Alexander Eliseev as student work a few years back is one such example. According to Eliseev, the piece came together very quickly… just two hours from conception to print. Which is fitting, given the subject matter. But it certainly doesn’t look like it was done in a hurry, but rather thoughtfully composed over time. We do know what it’s like to have things fall into place perfectly when a deadline is looming, though. Regardless of the turnaround time, this piece is a great example of experimental (and indulgently delicious) typography. More examples here and here and here.

Via Behance

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We are suckers for experimental typography, especially when it’s served up as a nice tidy alphabet. This outstanding series by Madrid-based designer Alejandro “Alex” López Becerro is one such example. Becerro is crazy talented, and his 3D work is on the mark. We love the variety that’s showcased here, which seems to be key to really successful avant-garde, if you will, alphabet work. His choice of textures and colors elevate this project. And we are particularly impressed with Becerro’s ability to establish a great sense of setting through light and shadow. Be sure to check out some of his other work, he’s a master at what he does.

More alphabet posts here and here and here.

Via Behance

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It’s no secret that we are totally taken with graphical interpretations of the alphabet, conceptual typography, and works that are done as a series. This gem of a project, by Paris-based designer Alexis Persani, gets high marks all around. Persani’s 3D illustration work is stellar. It doesn’t feel like the 3D is a gratuitous effect, but rather advances the concept of the figures. He is thoughtful in his choices, and presents each character as a sculpture that could stand on its own, paying particular attention to texture, lighting and color. Fantastic series that can be enjoyed by type geeks like us, or just about anyone else. Well done.

More experimental typography posts here and here and here.

Via Behance

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Sometimes you’ll find excellent examples of experimental typography in the most unexpected places. Take this terrific print ad from a Lithuanian grocer, for example. Under the art direction of Lithuanian designer Ignas Kozlovas by way of McCann Erickson, this typographic arrangement of real produce displays mastery in Photoshop, as well as an excellent eye for composition. Really well executed… would love to see the rest of the alphabet. Some other examples of produce in design here and here and here.

Via Behance

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This rather cerebral study of typography by Austrian designer/sculptor/artist Andreas Scheiger is quite fitting for Halloween. Taking inspiration from noted type designer Frederic W. Goudy´s “The Alphabet and Elements of Lettering,” and treating letters like organisms and typefaces as species, Scheiger created this amazing series, Evolution of Type. We’re fascinated by Scheiger’s surgical dissection and the sheer level of detail he achieves. Great concept and even better execution.

Via Behance

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We often focus on a single project or series, but the growing body of work by Kyle Wilkeson is just too good not to share. Wilkeson, Yorkshire, England-based letterer/designer/creative director, is innately talented. Quite simply, his work is special. From experimental lettering of Pecha Kucha promotional materials, to the thoughtful typography of his ADC invitation, to his surprisingly elegant and graphic Phaeton Chair, Wilkeson is a young designer to watch.

Via kylewilkinson.co.uk

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