Archives for posts with tag: exposure

Graffiti as we know it is a little less radical these days, much to the disappointment of some. Now sometimes referred to as street art, it has been elevated to just that: art. And with this new cultural regard comes greater exposure. We recently stumbled upon the work of Portuguese artist Sergio Odeith thanks to said exposure, and there is no doubt that his skills are highly artistic, “street” or otherwise. Odeith plays with our minds with his large-scale anamorphic creations he likes to call “sombre 3D”. His sense of space and perspective are astounding, with flawless artistic skills to match. Some of his works are straight up creepy, but that’s probably the point.

More street art posts here and here and here.

Via odeith.com and Instagram

 

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The (fleeting) art of pumpkin carving has certainly grown in popularity in recent years, partly due to increased exposure on social media, plus the rise of competitive television programs like Food Network’s Halloween Wars. Once called “the Picasso of Pumpkin Carving”, Arizona-based artist Ray Villafane finds himself in peak pumpkin season on this October 31, so we thought it fitting to take a look at his awe-inspiring work. Villafane, who naturally competed on Halloween Wars in its debut season back in 2011, is one of the most high-profile pumpkin carvers around, and for good reason. His work in a medium that is unfortunately very temporary is incredible on so many levels. From concept to execution, Villafane’s creations go well beyond the ubiquitous jack-o-lantern. In the hands of Villafane and company (collectively called Villafane Studios), these ghoulish gourds come to life with remarkable details and truly lifelike expression. We dare you to peruse through these few examples of his extraordinary work without an expression of utter wonderment and admiration. More spine-chilling posts here and here and here. Happy Halloween!

Via villafanestudios.com and Facebook

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Though relatively new on the scene of traditional film photography, German photographer Florian Imgrund creates masterful compositions the old school way. Imgrund got his first film camera just four years ago, and has been building an impressive body of work ever since. Employing double exposure techniques in the darkroom, Imgrund often merges beautiful landscapes with human forms… all without any computer manipulation. The results are incredible. Reminiscent of some other double exposure work here.

Via inthoughts.de

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Finnish artist Janne Parviainen uses a really intriguing technique in his photography, that could easily be mistaken for fancy Photoshop work. But no post editing here… Parviainen traces patterns and shapes using light sources caught with a camera on a long exposure setting. “I have traced entire rooms with a single LED light with the exposure times ranging from 20 minutes to 37 minutes,” he says. Parviainen capitalizes on these eerie effects, with really compelling results.

Via jannepaint.wix.com

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