Archives for posts with tag: expression

Michigan artist and educator Anne Mondro has a fascination with human anatomy, so pairing that interest with her superb crocheting skills was a natural union. Using thin copper and steel wire, Mondro creates beautifully intricate crocheted sculptures of hearts, lungs, limbs, and even entire bodies. In her own words, Mondro states, “My creative work explores the physical and emotional complexity of the human body. Intrigued by the ways the human body is experienced and valued in society, I create sculptures and images that investigate and portray various aspects of humanity. Crocheting (the process of using a hooked needle to pull loops from a continuous thread and working with one stitch at a time) enables the figures to interlace each other physically and metaphorically to express these aspects of humanity. The color and texture of the wire adds to the work by portraying the figures as ethereal silhouettes, evoking associations with mortality and spirituality.” This is not your grandmother’s needlework, that’s for certain.

Via annemondro.com and ceresgallery.org

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The (fleeting) art of pumpkin carving has certainly grown in popularity in recent years, partly due to increased exposure on social media, plus the rise of competitive television programs like Food Network’s Halloween Wars. Once called “the Picasso of Pumpkin Carving”, Arizona-based artist Ray Villafane finds himself in peak pumpkin season on this October 31, so we thought it fitting to take a look at his awe-inspiring work. Villafane, who naturally competed on Halloween Wars in its debut season back in 2011, is one of the most high-profile pumpkin carvers around, and for good reason. His work in a medium that is unfortunately very temporary is incredible on so many levels. From concept to execution, Villafane’s creations go well beyond the ubiquitous jack-o-lantern. In the hands of Villafane and company (collectively called Villafane Studios), these ghoulish gourds come to life with remarkable details and truly lifelike expression. We dare you to peruse through these few examples of his extraordinary work without an expression of utter wonderment and admiration. More spine-chilling posts here and here and here. Happy Halloween!

Via villafanestudios.com and Facebook

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Paper craft, using paper as the primary artistic medium for the creation of three-dimensional objects, is a highly specialized expression of one’s creativity. Though we don’t create this type of art ourselves, we certainly admire those who do (here and here and here). Milan-based artist Mauro Seresini is no exception. With little more than X-Acto knives and stockpiles of Bristol board, Seresini’s work ranges from editorial to advertising to commissions to large and small scale installations, and has attracted such luxury brands as Valentino, Tod’s and Lavazza. There is a certain unmistakable elegance to Seresini’s work, which clearly drew these clients to him. And the fact that Seresini is self-taught only heightens our affinity for his work. A true artist, through and through.

Via mauroseresini.com and Behance

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Though we would not necessarily describe ourselves, or our design philosophy as quirky, we can certainly appreciate an idiosyncratic design approach. Italian-based multidisciplinary design practice Mathery Studio seem to live and die by such an unconventional way of thinking, and it shows in their exceptional, and sometimes eccentric, work. Case in point is a recent project for Australian brand Odd Pears, which is in the business of selling creative and colorful mismatched socks. This campaign, Pull Them Up, is described as “a Monday to Friday guide to different ways to pull up your socks.” Mathery’s unique and humorous mode of expression is a perfect match (pun intended) for Odd Pears. In their own words, “In this campaign we focused on the act of ‘pulling up the socks’ and for five lucky Odd Pears trios we have designed a system which will allow every early morning-still-sleepy bird to get dressed in just one move.”

Via mathery.it

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It’s that time of year… Halloween-inspired art comes to the forefront, and is somehow appreciated just a little bit more, given the increased interest in all things ghosts, goblins, werewolves and the like. Say what you will, but there is no less artistic merit in thoughtfully conceived, masterfully executed art, no matter the subject matter. British paper artist Marc Hagan-Guirey, also known as Paper Dandy, is like a wizard with little more than an Xacto and a single sheet of paper (yes, no glue or adhesive of any kind). He’s well-versed in the art of “kirigami”, a variation of origami that includes cutting of the paper (from Japanese “kiru” = to cut, “kami” = paper). It is also called “Kirie”. From “Kiru”= to cut, “e”= picture. Hagan-Guirey’s latest project, cleverly titled Horrorgami, draws its inspiration from classic horror films. The recently released book (available here), derived from his well-received exhibition a few years back, features “20 gruesome scenes to cut and fold”. We love the intricate details Hagan-Guirey achieves, and the expression in his work. The photos throughout the book are also notable, lit in such a way that really brings each piece to life. More paper art posts here and here and here.

Happy Halloween!

Via paperdandy.co.uk

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