Archives for posts with tag: expressive

We feature fan art (here and here and here) from time to time… we are all about equal opportunity, and certainly feel there’s a place for such creativity. While some in the art community discount fan art because it is based on someone else’s original content, we are from the camp that believes fan art, though not necessarily a complete original expression of the artist because it is derived from already existing content, is a creative expression nonetheless. Fan artists add their own individual style, which is intrinsically expressive and unique. One such case is that of Montreal-based artist Dada, who has a clear penchant for Disney stories in particular. She draws familiar Disney characters not necessarily to mimic them exactly, but to present them in new and distinctive ways. Dada’s latest series merges beloved Disney heroes with their often maligned counterparts. Her drawing skills are impressive, and we love the process videos she often posts on social media. This nod to a very open and unfettered process of art making is certainly in the spirit of Disney, and just reinforces the sense that we all share a love and admiration for their wondrous storytelling. What fun it is to see these clear juxtapositions of good versus evil. Well done.

Via Instagram

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Using toilet paper rolls in craft projects is pretty common in the elementary school set. But not so much in the art world. Paris-based sculptor/paper artist Junior Fritz Jacquet defies convention with these remarkably expressive masks. Each made from a single toilet paper roll masterfully manipulated by Jacquet, this set of 40 masks is really something to behold. Inspired by the traditional art of origami, Jacquet sculpts the cardboard by hand, then applies pigment and shellac. Just terrific.

Via juniorfritzjacquet.com and matthieugauchet.fr

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Book cover design is no easy task. Much like logo design, book cover design is a tall order that strives to visually represent often complex concepts and themes. Belgian designer/illustrator Levente Szabó (whose stellar work we have featured before) has this on lock-down, as exhibited by his fantastic ongoing series of book cover designs of his favorite novels. His expressive and bold illustration style, along with a keen sense of color and type make for some really great pieces.

Via Behance

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Award-winning, Sydney, Australia-based photographer Sébastien Millier has a fantastic story telling ability through both photography and written words. His thoughtful and expressive work really captures his subjects in a special way. We especially like his “Stories” series, specifically his Golden Soil project. There is something to be said for Millier’s writing, which is just as compelling as his photography (we love the appropriately golden cast of these photos). Millier brings to life something that could otherwise have come across as mundane. Golden Soil tells the story of an Australian mining site. An excerpt: “Broken Hill is a small town in outback New South Wales, Australia, a pocket of civilization in the middle of wide brown land. Flat, dry and rich in minerals, the surrounding area is a miner’s paradise, a kind of geological Las Vegas of unearthly proportions….”

Via sebastienmillier.com

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Milwaukee-based artist Marc Sijan’s work is reminiscent of highly expressive Greek sculptors, but with a modern, ultra-realistic twist. Sijan achieves such authenticity through negative polyester resin casts of live models, then applies 25 coats of paint, plus varnish. In hi own words, Sijan says “”I am seeking to freeze motion rather than suggest life… The sculpture appears passive, but there is so much going on inside.” There really is so much going on inside this incredible work indeed.

Via marcsijan.com

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