Archives for posts with tag: exquisite

We’ve looked at double exposure photography many times before (here and here and here), but we’ve never seen analog work quite like this arresting series, Jarred & Displaced, by Finnish photographer Christoffer Relander. We often marvel at artists who choose more traditional or “old school” methods of art making, which is the case with Relander’s striking photos here. Rather than capturing his photos digitally, then quickly bringing them into Photoshop for manipulation, Relander takes to the dark room to work his magic. While each composite is brilliant by its own merits, Relander’s process somehow makes his work that much more precious. As if pouring his heart into these very personal photographs was not enough, Relander also collaborated with fellow Finnish photographer and filmmaker Anders Lönnfeldt on a simply exquisite short film about this project, which is a true work of art in and of itself. In his own words, Relander discusses this mysteriously beautiful ongoing project: “For over a year now I’ve been collecting landscapes in jars using analog double exposures—in this project I have realized a childish dream. I play with the idea of being an ambitious collector; conserving my environments into a large personal collection. Most landscapes are from where I grew up, in the countryside in the south of Finland, where my roots still lie. Separation anxiety to my childhood is simply what absorbed me into this project.”

Via christofferrelander.com

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Sometimes the simplest, most masterfully executed works are the most touching. In this case, the winsome short film by Dallas-based husband and wife, filmmaking and painting duo, Sai and Amanda Selvarajan called Sugarless Tea. Simple, not in a lack effort or depth of creativity, but in purity of concept and implementation. By way of exquisite watercolor paintings captured in stop motion technique, Sugarless Tea tells a story of man’s quest from “the biggest thing God made” (India) to “ the biggest thing man made” (New York City) to reunite with his identical twin brother after fifty four years. The film has garnered multiple accolades since its release 13 months ago, and we can certainly see why. Brilliant.

Via Vimeo

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When you (literally and figuratively) hold a magnifying glass up to some of nature’s more diminutive wonders, some breathtaking sights are revealed. We’ve seen artists examine mushrooms, sand and even the human eye. Naturalist photographer Samuel Jaffe’s thing is caterpillars. Having grown up in Eastern Massachusetts with a distinct curiosity about the world around him and a penchant for photography, Jaffe’s development of a project to raise and photograph native caterpillars seems natural. Jaffe’s documentation of a variety of caterpillars on black backgrounds not only highlight the beautiful patterns and textures from a scientific and investigatory standpoint, they also make exquisite photographs all on their own. You might even catch a hint of personality from these other-worldly creatures in Jaffe’s amazing shots.

Via samueljaffe.com

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It seems as if we are currently in the golden age of superheroes, at least if the release of major motion pictures is a gauge. These characters seem so pervasive in popular culture today, not just in the US but worldwide, that inspired works of art are almost inevitable. French photographer Sacha Goldberger really raises the bar with his phenomenal series Super Flemish. Goldberger uses not only superheroes, but also science-fiction and a few other characters from popular fantasies, and poses some intriguing questions: What if Superman was born in the sixteenth century? What if the Hulk was a Duke? How might Van Eyck have portrayed Snow White? And he answers them beautifully in this mashup of modern day superheroes, Flemish painting techniques and Elizabethan-era fashion. These works are really quite exquisite, and certainly thought-provoking. Well done, Mr. Goldberger!

This series is slightly reminiscent of work by British artist Steve Payne. More superhero related posts here and here and here.

Via sachabada.com

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