Archives for posts with tag: eye

The old adage goes, “beauty is in the eye of the beholder.” Munich-based photographer/artist Nick Frank’s series Farbraum, which translates from German to “color space”, is a look at otherwise mundane sights through the eyes of a gifted visual artist. In this terrific series, Frank literally extracts colors from these images, and brings them to the forefront in compelling new ways. Frank’s sense of color and composition are quite masterful. In his own words, Frank describes the project: “What is beauty? A rusty street lamp which has not lit up a road in a while. Buildings made out of prefabricated concrete in the middle of nowhere. Faded drainage pipes covered with rust and dust. Farbraum offers evidence that beauty is indeed in the eye of the beholder. Everyday objects perceived as ugly by society are suddenly moved into a new light by extracting colors – and even more: by leaching and overlapping colored accents of the motif it gains an additional dimension. The color stripes with the isolated main color and four secondary colors of the image finally show a greater variance within the image: the variance of depth. Objects turn tangible and vivid.”

Via nickfrank.de

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Romanian photographer Andrei Mogan has a thing for eyes. His fantastic series of macro shots, titled Look Into My Eyes, is quite beautiful, uncovering intricacies that otherwise go unnoticed. Mogan’s work is reminiscent of Your Beautiful Eyes series by Armenian photographer Suren Manvelyan. Andrei takes it a step further, however, by also photographing his subjects clutching prints of their eyes. We love this approach, it gives some context to the subject matter, and makes these shots that much more striking.

Via Facebook

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It wasn’t long ago we featured the work of Hungarian photographer/artist Flora Borsi. Once again, Borsi brings a certain edginess to the art of digital manipulation. While retouching can sometimes be seen as gratuitous, Borsi elevates photo-manipulation to an art form. Her work is both thoughtful and thought-provoking. In her latest series of self-portraits she calls Animeyed, Borsi poses with animals in such a way that they seem to share an eye. Her work has an interesting way of coming across as playful, but also slightly uncomfortable at the same time. Creative, clever and captivating. Once again, we love it.

Via floraborsi.com

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Whatever you prefer to call it – hyper-realistic, super-realistic, photo-realistic – what’s real is the remarkable level of skill involved. We’re so taken with this type of art, we’ve featured it several times before (here and here and here and here). This time, it’s the work of Singapore-based artist Ivan Hoo. What makes his work unique is his canvas of choice… a simple board of wood. Hoo’s incredibly realistic pieces interact directly with the wood surface, creating the illusion of three-dimensionality. What’s even more impressive is that Hoo is self-taught. Armed with a few colored pencils, pastels and inks, Hoo transforms everyday objects into drawings with unbelievable results. His Starbucks cup is one of our favorites. Try not to drool too much.

Via Instagram and Tumblr

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[Nutella.Spill.] #wip. #pastel on wood.

A post shared by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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Trash versus treasure is all relative, as everyone pretty much knows by now. Rhode Island-based artist Tom Deininger takes the old adage to heart through his remarkable collage work. From idealistic landscapes (one of which is inspired by Impressionist master Monet), to detailed portraiture, to denim seascapes, to large-scale commissions, Deininger truly transforms found, often discarded, objects into things of beauty and awe. We imagine his workspace to look like The Island of Misfit Toys. It takes true skill, an acute sense of space and color, to compose these stunning pieces. To say that Deininger is an accomplished collage artist is an understatement. Incredible work.

More killer collage work here, here and here.

Via tomdeiningerart.com

 

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It’s interesting how some of the most common things can seem obscure with a different point of view. This is certainly the case with Armenian photographer/Renaissance man (he also has a PhD in physics, teaches mathematics and astronomy, and plays a variety of musical instruments) Suren Manvelyan’s series of macro photographs of human eyes called Your Beautiful Eyes. The complexity of the iris is revealed in these remarkable photographs, almost appearing to be some foreign landscape. The intricate fibrous structure of the eye is just breathtaking, and something, ironically enough, we cannot see with our eyes alone. Manvelyan’s lighting is particularly noteworthy… these photos could have been much less impressive in the hands of a less adept photographer. Absolutely beautiful (and almost otherworldly). Be sure to also check out Manvelyan’s animal eye series here and here.

Via surenmanvelyan.com

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