Archives for posts with tag: eyes

Not speaking to strangers is a lesson learned early and practiced often, but this fascinating ongoing photography series flies in the face of such prudence. Mumbai-based photographer Jay Weinstein attempts to break down barriers during this particularly vigilant time in world history, one smile at a time. Aptly titled “…so I asked them to smile”, this minimalist photography project explores the smiles of strangers, and how facial expressions truly transform perceptions and soften even the most hardened of appearances. Weinstein captures strangers in two different poses: one without a smile and one while smiling. See for yourself… with no other context (Weinstein does not provide life stories, names, occupations, confirmed religions or ethnicity), it’s striking to see how a simple smile can humanize a perfect stranger. Weinstein describes the genesis of this compelling sociological experiment in his own words: “December 2013. I was on a photography trip to Bikaner, in the deserts of Rajasthan, India. Near the busy train station, I saw a man I wanted to photograph. I hesitated. The look in his eye and his stony, stern face intimidated me. It’s always that moment of hesitation that kills a shot! I ended up avoiding him and photographing other subjects until I heard his jovial voice, “Take my picture too!” Camera lens focused, my finger poised to fire. ‘Smile’, I called out. And he was transformed. His face radiated warmth, his eyes sparkled with a humor I had completely missed. Even his posture softened. I knew then what my next project would be. So I asked them to smile was born. I wanted to document the effect of the human smile on a strangers face.”

Via soiaskedthemtosmile.com

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On the heels of (no pun intended) the wildly popular Humans of New York series by Brandon Stanton, photographer Stacey Baker takes a slightly different approach, but in a similar vein. Baker, associate photo editor at The New York Times Magazine, takes to the streets and photographs women’s legs from the waist down. The collection as a whole, of meticulously composed shots, documents a dizzying diversity of figures and fashions, with these swift street encounters with perfect strangers. Baker has documented this series on social media, amassing almost 80,000 Instagram followers along the way. Her recently published book, NY Legs, is available for purchase (here).

Via Instragram and lensculture.com

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Japanese artist and student Hikaru Cho seems to employ her stellar artistic skills with a single purpose: illusion. Whether it be illustration, body painting, or sculpture, Cho aims to woo viewers with deception… in a (usually) playful, lighthearted manner, of course. Her work can be a bit unnerving at times… adding extra eyes, misplacing ears, etc. On the other hand, she also likes to play with food, disguising one food as another, for example. No matter that subject matter, Cho’s work certainly intrigues. Her personality shines through, which is impressive considering her tremendous skill set. It’s hard to believe she’s still a student! Cho certainly has a bright future ahead… we’re going to keep an eye on her.

Via hikarucho.com

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Romanian photographer Andrei Mogan has a thing for eyes. His fantastic series of macro shots, titled Look Into My Eyes, is quite beautiful, uncovering intricacies that otherwise go unnoticed. Mogan’s work is reminiscent of Your Beautiful Eyes series by Armenian photographer Suren Manvelyan. Andrei takes it a step further, however, by also photographing his subjects clutching prints of their eyes. We love this approach, it gives some context to the subject matter, and makes these shots that much more striking.

Via Facebook

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It wasn’t long ago we featured the work of Hungarian photographer/artist Flora Borsi. Once again, Borsi brings a certain edginess to the art of digital manipulation. While retouching can sometimes be seen as gratuitous, Borsi elevates photo-manipulation to an art form. Her work is both thoughtful and thought-provoking. In her latest series of self-portraits she calls Animeyed, Borsi poses with animals in such a way that they seem to share an eye. Her work has an interesting way of coming across as playful, but also slightly uncomfortable at the same time. Creative, clever and captivating. Once again, we love it.

Via floraborsi.com

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Trash versus treasure is all relative, as everyone pretty much knows by now. Rhode Island-based artist Tom Deininger takes the old adage to heart through his remarkable collage work. From idealistic landscapes (one of which is inspired by Impressionist master Monet), to detailed portraiture, to denim seascapes, to large-scale commissions, Deininger truly transforms found, often discarded, objects into things of beauty and awe. We imagine his workspace to look like The Island of Misfit Toys. It takes true skill, an acute sense of space and color, to compose these stunning pieces. To say that Deininger is an accomplished collage artist is an understatement. Incredible work.

More killer collage work here, here and here.

Via tomdeiningerart.com

 

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It’s interesting how some of the most common things can seem obscure with a different point of view. This is certainly the case with Armenian photographer/Renaissance man (he also has a PhD in physics, teaches mathematics and astronomy, and plays a variety of musical instruments) Suren Manvelyan’s series of macro photographs of human eyes called Your Beautiful Eyes. The complexity of the iris is revealed in these remarkable photographs, almost appearing to be some foreign landscape. The intricate fibrous structure of the eye is just breathtaking, and something, ironically enough, we cannot see with our eyes alone. Manvelyan’s lighting is particularly noteworthy… these photos could have been much less impressive in the hands of a less adept photographer. Absolutely beautiful (and almost otherworldly). Be sure to also check out Manvelyan’s animal eye series here and here.

Via surenmanvelyan.com

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Irish artist Eoin O’Connor (best known as simply Eoin) has a few passions that inspire his art. Surf culture references dominate his large scale work, but he has recently also been experimenting with these visually stunning eyes. Eoin describes his ongoing quest to establish his own unique style: “I mainly paint ocean inspired scenes in which I try to capture some of the energy experienced while in and around the water. Over the past year I have been working towards merging the 3 areas in which I draw inspiration – surfing, street art and fine art. My goal is to create something that can bridge the gaps between genres and stand alone as my own style.” We’d say he is well on his way.

Via artbyeoin.com

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