Archives for posts with tag: fashion

It’s true that we’ve seen our fair share of movie posters through the years (here, here and here), but nothing quite like these. Manchester, UK-based designer/photographer/poster artist Jordan Bolton doesn’t rely on highly stylized shots from the film, or even the film’s actors. No effects-laden titles or much typography to speak of at all. Instead, for his Objects series, Bolton meticulously arranges prop elements from each film, paying careful attention to color palettes and composition to relay the film’s themes. For his Rooms series, Bolton applies that same attention to detail, focusing instead on recreating floor plans from keys scenes in the films. We cannot imagine how much close watching of these films Bolton does to be able to create these works. This is a true cinephile’s dream, and lucky for them Bolton sells prints here and here.

Via Tumblr and Facebook

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On the heels of (no pun intended) the wildly popular Humans of New York series by Brandon Stanton, photographer Stacey Baker takes a slightly different approach, but in a similar vein. Baker, associate photo editor at The New York Times Magazine, takes to the streets and photographs women’s legs from the waist down. The collection as a whole, of meticulously composed shots, documents a dizzying diversity of figures and fashions, with these swift street encounters with perfect strangers. Baker has documented this series on social media, amassing almost 80,000 Instagram followers along the way. Her recently published book, NY Legs, is available for purchase (here).

Via Instragram and lensculture.com

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Paper craft, using paper as the primary artistic medium for the creation of three-dimensional objects, is a highly specialized expression of one’s creativity. Though we don’t create this type of art ourselves, we certainly admire those who do (here and here and here). Milan-based artist Mauro Seresini is no exception. With little more than X-Acto knives and stockpiles of Bristol board, Seresini’s work ranges from editorial to advertising to commissions to large and small scale installations, and has attracted such luxury brands as Valentino, Tod’s and Lavazza. There is a certain unmistakable elegance to Seresini’s work, which clearly drew these clients to him. And the fact that Seresini is self-taught only heightens our affinity for his work. A true artist, through and through.

Via mauroseresini.com and Behance

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With the proliferation of digital photography, pared with editing software like Photoshop, photo retouching is basically the norm these days. There has certainly been some controversy (good example here) surrounding the practice, especially when it comes to the issue of misrepresentation. Hungarian photographer/artist Flora Borsi specializes in digital manipulation, but with surprising effect that can even be described as unnerving. Turning retouching on its head, with her project Stockify, Borsi’s work clearly finds inspiration from legendary surrealist painters that came before her, most notably Picasso and Dali. Borsi brings the fundamentals of surrealist artwork, particularly unexpected juxtapositions, to the digital age with this arresting series. In her own words, “In this project I’ve been analyzing some fashion portraits, how perfect they are. So I made the opposite of retouching, somehow I distouched these pictures of perfect models. This project is connected to surrealist painters point of view: beauty wasn’t enough to give me interest. I love imperfections as much as I love surrealism. These pictures are my little monsters, no one wants to look like them, because they are totally unique.”

Via floraborsi.com

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It’s often said that fashion inspiration comes from a really wide and diverse assortment of sources, and we’re certain food is one of them. The work of San Francisco-based artist Gretchen Röehrs makes for a pretty amusing and rather literal interpretation of such influence. Röehrs dresses up her whimsical fashion sketches with a variety of foods, manipulating everything from artichokes to oyster shells, to mimic the lines and curves of clothing. Deliciously du jour, indeed.

Via Instagram

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While fashion and still life photography can be very straightforward, we’re always pleased when we see it take a conceptual turn. London-based Lithuanian photographer Aleksandra Kingo is particularly adept at elevating her work to art. Her personality shines through, and makes for some very compelling work. In her own words, her work is “feminine, a bit awkward and full of irony. She believes that photography should be personal and loves the possibility of creating any kind of world through her medium. Most of her work is based around people and their identities and she gains a lot inspiration from everyday life stories as well as popular culture.”

Via aleksandrakingo.com

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Type geeks rejoice! We love inventive type, like this stellar work by Madrid-based art director/designer Andrés Momó. Fittingly for “DASHAPE” sneaker event in Spain, Momó literally threaded sneaker laces in the shape of letters to form the title of the event. The care he took with the letterforms shows. And somehow, this just wouldn’t be the same if it was digitally rendered… Momó taking the time to create this the old school way gets major props in our book.

Via Behance

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At first glance, it’s not immediately apparent what these round masses are. But upon closer examination, it’s clear that these are actually very familiar sights (albeit from a disorienting angle). Chinese photographer Lo Cheuk Lun and his Shanghai-based photography studio, Stuff, shot these shampoo-lathered heads for monthly international fashion magazine Numéro. While the concept is rather interesting, this could have been sort of dull and uninspiring. In the skillful hands of Cheuk Lun, however, the series really comes to life. It’s executed perfectly, and we’d love to see even more hair types. It’s a wonder this wasn’t conceived sooner. Well done.

Via wwwstuffcom.com

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At first glance, one might deduce that this series of vivid, eye-catching photos is for some high-brow fashion campaign, or conceptual art project. Much to our surprise and delight, they are actually part of a bold print and outdoor advertising campaign from a few years back, entitled Adaptation, for, of all things, Barcelona City Council. That’s right, government, more or less. Shot by acclaimed Spanish photographer Paco Peregrín, and art directed by London-based Conor Cronin, this campaign is so different from what we’d expect from anything remotely bureaucratic, that’s it’s certainly attention getting, and even slightly refreshing. Could you even imagine a campaign like this for your local city council? Perhaps Spaniards are more culturally and artistically evolved. Or maybe the aesthetic sophistication juxtaposed with a purpose, though noble, rather mundane, was exactly the point. Either way, we’re talking about it thousands of miles away, and that is impressive by any measure.

Via pacoperegrin.com and conorcronin.com

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There is something to be said about fan art. By its very nature, fan art is created as a sort of labor of love, and generally not commissioned or endorsed by the creators of the work from which the fan art derives. For Tumblr artist simply known as Punziella, Disney characters are her subject of choice. It’s not that often that we feature fan art, but Punziella is quite adept at transforming said Disney characters. She gives them a makeover, taking them out of whatever time period we’re accustomed to seeing them, and dresses them in current fashions. Not an easy task, but executed like a pro by Punziella. Nice work!

More fan art here, and Disney-inspired art here and here.

Via Tumblr

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