Archives for posts with tag: fast food

Melbourne, Australia-based contemporary artist Ben Frost has a pop art aesthetic with a subversive, confrontational spirit. In some of his most recent work, Frost essentially uses mainly (junk) food and pharmaceutical packaging as a canvas for his bold illustrations inspired by pop culture, Roy Lichtenstein, and manga. His mashups are not random, though… Frost exhibits his mastery of juxtaposition with these works in a way that can be truly provocative. Through his work, Frost continually pushes boundaries and challenges social norms while addressing our advertising-soaked, consumer-obsessed culture. In his own statement, Frost describes: “By subverting mainstream iconography from the worlds of advertising, entertainment, and politics, he creates a visual framework that is bold, confronting and often controversial.”

Via benfrostisdead.com

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Italian photographer Dan Bannino is a consummate storyteller with a particular penchant for still life and commercial photography. Much of his work could just as easily find a home on a gallery wall as in the pages of a mass market magazine, like National Geographic, Harper’s Bazaar, Elle, Cosmopolitan and many others. With his terrific Power and Food series, Bannino explores the eating habits of powerful and influential people from around the world. In our celebrity-obsessed culture any glimpse “behind the curtain,” so to speak, is valued. A look into the private lives of public figures, no matter how brief or inconsequential, makes us feel a little closer to them. Bannino’s series capitalizes on that curiosity, with his vibrant and arresting images. We particularly love his compositions and bold style. In his own words, Bannino states, “If you’re a fast food aficionado or a pizza freak, you have more in common with Mr. Donald J. Trump, and Pope Francis himself than you ever imagined. Check out some of the most unexpected food patterns of the world’s leaders, and you’ll never eat the same way again.”

Via danbannino.com

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With the latest Apple releases, so too will come the flood of YouTube videos of folks “testing” the new devices in all sorts of precarious scenarios (submerging your new iPhone in a vat of soda, then freezing it for 12 hours, anyone?). New Zealand-born, Brooklyn-based photographer/artist Henry Hargreaves (whose stellar work we’ve discussed here and here) takes a more cerebral approach to a practice that is no less cringe-inducing to us gadget geeks. Hargreaves, along with his stylist partner Caitlin Levin, whose incredible collaborations almost always employ food as the medium, juxtaposes said electronic devices with fast food in their series Deep Fried Gadgets. While we do shudder slightly at the sight of intentionally defacing these gizmos that we hold in such high regard, we certainly appreciate the concept and commentary, not to mention the fascinatingly engaging visuals. In Hargreaves’s own words, “I like to play with food and the juxtaposition of different worlds. I found a video of some Japanese kids trying to deep fry a PSP and eat it, it didn’t work and they made a mess of it, but I loved the idea and thought it could be expanded and photographed in a beautiful way. Electronics have become almost a holy device, the way a new apple device sends people out of their minds. But as soon as the next model comes out the last is immediately forgotten. This is a commentary about the similarities between tech culture and fast food. Quickly devoured and then discarded because of our appetite for the newest product.”

Via hargreavesandlevin.com

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Let’s be honest here, food and typography are two of our favorite things. So when the two are paired with great skill, we take notice. This well-executed poster by Russian art director Alexander Eliseev as student work a few years back is one such example. According to Eliseev, the piece came together very quickly… just two hours from conception to print. Which is fitting, given the subject matter. But it certainly doesn’t look like it was done in a hurry, but rather thoughtfully composed over time. We do know what it’s like to have things fall into place perfectly when a deadline is looming, though. Regardless of the turnaround time, this piece is a great example of experimental (and indulgently delicious) typography. More examples here and here and here.

Via Behance

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Spanish art director Rafael Quilez of McCann Erickson in Madrid created this award-winning print campaign for a hospital cardiology department. It’s a shame the campaign is so specific, because the concept — that poor choices and bad habits cause more deaths than natural catastrophes, severe accidents, and even war – seems to be an important one to expose to the masses. And Quilez’s execution is right on the money. Bravo, really well done.

Via cargocollective.com

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Brooklyn-based photographer Jon Feinstein takes an unconventional approach to food photography in one of his latest projects. Rather than some sort of slick, carefully-lit setup, Feinstein has stripped his subjects from their familiar context, by scanning each (still-warm) item on a flatbed scanner. All the while, capturing a fascinating juxtaposition of the both “revolting and mouthwatering” nature of fast food. In his own words, Feinstein explains: “These photographs investigate the love/hate relationship that many Americans have with fast food, and, like many other aspects of popular culture, its ability to be simultaneously seductive and repulsive.”

Via jonfeinstein.com

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