Archives for posts with tag: female

In honor of National Coffee Day, we thought it fitting to showcase an artist who (subtly) uses the magical brown elixir to make art. Maui-based mixed-media artist Alessandra Maria creates beautifully detailed, dark and delicate portraits using little more than a pencil, black ink and gold leaf on coffee-stained paper. Inspired by Austrian symbolist painter Gustav Klimt, Maria’s haunting life-like portraits evoke fantasy and mystery with intricate details set on an eerily enigmatic surface achieved through the coffee’s dark brown grounds. There are even religious overtones in these thought-provoking masterpieces. Maria’s work is simply beautiful and poignant.

Via alessandramaria.com

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On the heels of (no pun intended) the wildly popular Humans of New York series by Brandon Stanton, photographer Stacey Baker takes a slightly different approach, but in a similar vein. Baker, associate photo editor at The New York Times Magazine, takes to the streets and photographs women’s legs from the waist down. The collection as a whole, of meticulously composed shots, documents a dizzying diversity of figures and fashions, with these swift street encounters with perfect strangers. Baker has documented this series on social media, amassing almost 80,000 Instagram followers along the way. Her recently published book, NY Legs, is available for purchase (here).

Via Instragram and lensculture.com

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Traditional painterly techniques combined with a modern graphic sensibility makes for some very compelling work. American-born, Berlin-based artist James Bullough’s body of work is the perfect example of this striking juxtaposition. Bullough has a penchant for realism, but also employs a masterful geometric style that sort of fractures his compositions. And his sense of composition is at the heart of what makes his work so effective. Not only does Bullough produce more standard size paintings and drawings, but he also works in a much larger scale to create killer murals. Bullough cites a wide range of artistic influences, and adapts them beautifully. His notable technical skill paired with his appreciation for urban graffiti converge in a perfect storm. We are in awe.

Via jamesbullough.com

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It’s often said that fashion inspiration comes from a really wide and diverse assortment of sources, and we’re certain food is one of them. The work of San Francisco-based artist Gretchen Röehrs makes for a pretty amusing and rather literal interpretation of such influence. Röehrs dresses up her whimsical fashion sketches with a variety of foods, manipulating everything from artichokes to oyster shells, to mimic the lines and curves of clothing. Deliciously du jour, indeed.

Via Instagram

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Art and design can be powerful tools to raise awareness and permeate public consciousness. Visual impact can often be more commanding than words alone. Ecuadorian artist Maria Jose Cabezas clearly knows this, and capitalizes on the ability of well-conceived, expertly executed imagery to convey a message. With a global culture steeped in preoccupation with physical appearances, Cabezas’s work here clearly has a place. She sheds light on sensitive issues that rarely get the attention they deserve, like anorexia and bulimia. In her own words, Cabezas hopes to “enlighten the consequences of the obsession with beauty.” This work could not be more relevant, and we really appreciate the merits of Cabezas’s work, not only artistically, but also socially.

Via Behance

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We must admit, we have a certain fascination with messy things. There are definitely scholarly psychological studies on the matter, but our armchair psychologist observation falls somewhere in the realm of an innate human interest in discomfort, and how a visual mess makes one feel. While some are unfazed, others may be repulsed or attracted to a mess. We’re just scratching the surface here, in terms of experiences and the mental processes behind them, but San Diego-based photographer Keith Allen Phillips actually sets forth an intriguing series that got us thinking about this in the first place. Aptly entitled Messy, Phillips’s series verges on the subversive… naked women covered in a variety of messy foods. The results are actually sort of unexpected, and we almost forget about the food aspect, and focus instead on the mess, and how the models must feel (is it titillating, liberating, frustrating?). This thought-provoking series really does bring up so many feelings, exemplifying the true power of art.

Via keithallenphillips.com

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We’ve posted about double exposure photography techniques before (here and here). This series by Bulgaria-based photographer Aneta Ivanova sort of takes things a step further, with color photography and by integrating a thought provoking theme through the juxtaposition of natural elements with feminine beauty. On a purely aesthetic level, the portraits are simply beautiful. But the commentary on beauty is what really elevates these pieces to visual poetry.

Via anetaivanova.com

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Though we’ve seen his work before, it was only recently what we really took notice of Simon Birch’s stellar paintings. These large scale works by Birch, a U.K.-born artist, of Armenian descent, who is a permanent resident of Hong Kong, have an almost geometric quality to them. And from a distance, have a slight resemblance to manipulated photographs. There’s also something to be said for Birch’s sense of color, which is really remarkable. Any way you look at it, Birch’s talent is quite considerable. We’d love to see his work in person. Be sure to check out the video for a behind-the-scenes look at Birch in action.

Via simon-birch.com and Behance

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