Archives for posts with tag: fleeting

The (fleeting) art of pumpkin carving has certainly grown in popularity in recent years, partly due to increased exposure on social media, plus the rise of competitive television programs like Food Network’s Halloween Wars. Once called “the Picasso of Pumpkin Carving”, Arizona-based artist Ray Villafane finds himself in peak pumpkin season on this October 31, so we thought it fitting to take a look at his awe-inspiring work. Villafane, who naturally competed on Halloween Wars in its debut season back in 2011, is one of the most high-profile pumpkin carvers around, and for good reason. His work in a medium that is unfortunately very temporary is incredible on so many levels. From concept to execution, Villafane’s creations go well beyond the ubiquitous jack-o-lantern. In the hands of Villafane and company (collectively called Villafane Studios), these ghoulish gourds come to life with remarkable details and truly lifelike expression. We dare you to peruse through these few examples of his extraordinary work without an expression of utter wonderment and admiration. More spine-chilling posts here and here and here. Happy Halloween!

Via villafanestudios.com and Facebook

villafane-01 villafane-02 villafane-03 villafane-04 villafane-05 villafane-06 villafane-07 villafane-08 villafane-09 villafane-10 villafane-11 villafane-12 villafane-13 villafane-14 villafane-15 villafane-16 villafane-17 villafane-18 villafane-19 villafane-20 villafane-21 villafane-22 villafane-23

Advertisements

Photographs frequently serve as links to the past, often summoning up memories of a time that came before. Tennessee-based photographer Greg Sand capitalizes on this association, which is fundamental to his philosophy as an artist. In his own words, Sand says: “My work is about memory, the passage of time, mortality and the photograph’s role in shaping our experience of loss. Photography’s unique ability to capture a fleeting moment allows it to expose the temporality of life.” In his series entitled Remnants, Sand creates stunning works composed of three found photos from different times in the subject’s past, cut into strips and skillfully woven together to form a sort of cloth-like composite portrait. Sand says of woven cloth as a metaphor for memory: “As Peter Stallybrass writes in Worn Worlds, ‘The magic of cloth is that it receives us: receives our smells, our sweat, our shape even.’ This is one of the marvels of memory as well: we perceive each moment in our lives; these are eventually woven together to form our memory. Each piece in this series creates a likeness of an individual that–rather than depicting an accurate visual representation of that person at any given time–presents a recollected coalescence of that person’s appearances throughout his or her life.” We love the concept, and Sand’s execution is picture-perfect.

Via gregsand.net and Behance

Sand-01 Sand-02 Sand-03 Sand-04 Sand-05 Sand-06 Sand-07 Sand-08 Sand-09 Sand-10

When art and science collide, some pretty spectacular things can happen. Dutch visual artist Berndnaut Smilde applies a fascination with the complexities of duality (construction vs. deconstruction, inside vs. outside, etc.) to his work. Some of his most notable pieces involve literally bringing what is otherwise an outdoor phenomenon, clouds, indoors. And this makes for some pretty strikingly unfamiliar visuals. The ephemeral nature of this work is so powerful, existing for just a short time, and constantly changing (building up and falling apart) in the process. Smilde’s combination of smoke and moisture (and dramatic lighting) is an achievement in both visual art and science, even recognized by Time Magazine as one of the “Top Ten Inventions of 2012”. Be sure to check out the video at the bottom of this post to see Smilde’s clouds in motion.

More art and science marriages here and here and here.

Via berndnaut.nl and Vimeo

Smilde-1 Smilde-2 Smilde-3 Smilde-4 Smilde-5 Smilde-6 Smilde-7 Smilde-8

%d bloggers like this: