Archives for posts with tag: flight

Just when we thought the golden age of music videos has passed and true innovation was practically impossible, enter Los Angeles-based pop/rock band OK Go, who have made a reputation for music video ingenuity again and again. Their latest two videos, “Upside Down & Inside Out” and “The One Moment” (both released within about the past 13 months) continue to push boundaries. The former is a gravity-defying feat via what is referred to as parabolic flight. Without knowing the context, one would think it was an exercise in CGI and green screen trickery. But what makes this gem of a music video so special is the fact that the video was shot in a single, 45 minute take. Then non-micro-gravity portions were simply edited out, for a seamless looking weightless romp to the song’s three-minute length. The latter, “The One Moment”, is touted with the distinct honor of “the shortest amount ever filmed for a music video.” The video uses just 4.2 seconds of footage, stretched out to the song’s full-length by slowing down portions by some 20,000 percent. Sounds pretty straightforward, but rest assured the logistics behind this were meticulously orchestrated by some super creative minds. OK Go is diligent about offering a behind the scenes look at these mini masterpieces, which just bolsters our assertion that some folks simply use more of their creative potential than others. We cannot even begin to wrap our minds around how one would even dream up these concepts, let alone bring them to life. But we’re certainly glad these guys did. In a single word: inspiring. Now watch the videos… okay, go!

Via okgo.net

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Aerial photography has always intrigued us. The vantage point from high above presents so many opportunities to see things differently. But, when you think about it, it’s still a relatively small portion of photography. The rise of Google Maps aside, aerial photography is often something one must seek out. One terrific aerial photographer worth knowing is Florida-based Bill Yates. From a young age, Yates combined his two passions, flying and photography, into a truly extraordinary body of work. Clearly a man with a plan, Yates didn’t approach these fascinations recreationally. His credentials include being a member of a U.S. Naval Aviation squadron, as well as earning an MFA Degree in Photography from Rhode Island School of Design, while studying with master fine art photographers. Not too shabby. And his work speaks for itself. With the recent sharp uptick in chatter about the proliferation of drones here in the U.S and around the world, some impact on aerial photography will surely be felt. But if the work of Yates is not evidence of the importance of creative human vision behind the lens, we’re not sure what is.

More aerial photography posts here and here.

Via billyatescypix.com

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Self-described one-man studio Neil Stevens has an appreciation for vintage type, as do many of us designers. There’s something pure about it, free from extraneous effects or trendy design devices. This collection of flight tag prints by the London based designer/illustrator captures the essence of a bygone design era (and would make a great inspirational addition to our studio walls, I might add). In his own words: “Recently I stumbled on a lovely set of old airline baggage tags and was amazed at the variety in designs produced since the 1950s. There was something about the now iconic, easily recognizable three letter abbreviations of the city destinations, and the small surrounding details that I thought would look great blown up and on a wall. They often avoided logos, had no advertising, and were purely just the information you needed.” Prints available here.

Via crayonfire.co.uk

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