Archives for posts with tag: food photography

The work of Montreal-based Mathieu Lévesque is, quite simply, a masterclass in food photography. We are in awe of Lévesque’s ability to apply his own creative vision to everything he (re)touches. His attention to detail is remarkable. And the wit and whimsy present in so much of his work elevates it to the next level. We are engaged on many levels by his work… inspired, envious and hungry!

Via Behance

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Conceptual food photography has got to be one of our favorite niche disciplines lately, only confirmed by this excellent collaboration between Sydney-based creatives Enrico Becker and Matt Harris. Created as visuals to accompany editorial on genetically modified foods, these photos could easily stand on their own. We love the choice of colors and thoughtful compositions. The pastel tones of the produce, along with the bar codes of course, push the work into surreal territory. And quite effectively, we might add. In his own words, Becker explains, “As shooting style, we were going for a more pastel monochromatic still-life style approach. The end result of the shoot was combined in an awesome two-spread magazine layout with a well written article about genetically modified food by Matt Harris. The idea was to create a combination between the photography and the written text.” Oh, and did we mention these guys are also students? Nice work, by any measure.

Via enricobecker.com

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We certainly have a thing for creative food photography (here and here and here), so it’s no surprise that the inventive work of London-based photographer David Sykes caught our eye. Sykes looks at food from an unconventional perspective, and we particularly like the subtle injection of humor in his work. In fact, it’s not exactly food photography, but food-like. His keen eye for composition and smart use of color prove that Sykes is more than a quirky photographer, but a terrific conceptual artist.

Via davidsykes.com

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Food and color are two of our favorite things… combine that with very systematic arrangements, and we’re in seventh heaven. So when we stumbled upon the work of Seattle-based photographer/food fanatic Brittany Wright, we were immediately taken with her stunning compositions. Wright not only arranges fruit and vegetables in a spectrum that’s pleasing to the eye, but she also captures changes through the aging process, and sometimes cooking. Her approach is actually less like food photography, and more abstract. Wright’s terrific sense of color is clear in her very nuanced groupings. She has even branched out from fresh produce, and started exploring other types of foods too. Wright’s work appeals to us on a variety of levels, and if her growing number of Instagram followers is any indication, we’re not alone in that.

More orderly food photography here and here and here.

Via wrightkitchen.com and Instagram

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When it comes to an art medium we can really sink our teeth into, food is near the top of our list. After all, few things bring people together like food. It’s relatable, familiar, often comforting, and let’s face it, essential to our very being. Philadelphia-based photographer Dominic Episcopo invites viewers to “Meat America” through this engaging and polarizing series of photographs of, well, meat — carved, molded, manipulated — to look like American icons. Episcopo describes the project as “an eye-opening and artery-closing tour of America’s spirit of entrepreneurship, rebellion and positivity.” From Elvis, to Lincoln, to the Liberty Bell as subjects, Episcopo’s carnivorous wit shines through. And his photography skills are not too shabby either. Patriotic protein aside, Episcopo’s sense of composition and lighting is stellar. A less skilled photographer would not have pulled this off so well. Episcopo’s book available here.

More food art here and here and here.

Via meatamerica.com

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Our love of food here at Barbour is no secret. In fact, it’s a requirement. So we pose the question, is there anything better than this project? Actually initiated by the 8-year-old son of New York City area-based writer/designer/blogger Chris Durso, The Foodnited States of America is a deliciously terrific tour of the U.S. Sure, there have been plenty of food-geography mashups (here and here), but this one is different. The “punny” play on words sells it, and the superb execution knocks it out of the park. Durso rolls out states one-by-one on his Instagram page (hashtag #foodnitedstates), and he’s just passed the halfway mark. This is one to watch, folks. Sampling below, but be sure to head over to Durso’s Instagram for more.

Via Instagram and foodiggity.com

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This is the time of year when people the world over carve pumpkins. But for UK-based photographer Ilian Iliev, carving produce is a practice that takes place all year long. Iliev is a food photographer by trade, having dabbled in journalistic photography at the start of his career, and eventually making his way into commercial photography. His artistic aspirations and love of food led him to this terrific project… a series of creative food carvings. Not only are his carvings beautifully detailed, but Iliev’s photography skills really shine. Well done!

More food-inspired posts here and here and here.

Via ilian.co.uk

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We always appreciate inventive and surprising typography, and this is a great example by South African designer/illustrator Vus Ngxande. Handcrafted typography is a fantastic contrast to computer-generated graphics, and Ngxande’s execution works very well for this community outreach arm of South African retail giant Woolworths. Being the sole imagery in this 48-page booklet, the vibrant typography really pops. Well done.

More food-based typography here and here and here.

Via Behance

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Information design, though fulfilling when done effectively and successfully, can be a tedious task for the designer. Ryan MacEachern, a young UK designer and recent grad, seems to have a particular knack for this type of design, as evidenced by his outstanding project “Design x Food”. MacEachern explains, “A day before I was given a brief to present information on a personal habit over a period of a week I started a very bland and uninteresting low carbohydrate diet because I have previously been eating copious amounts of high fat, high sugar colourful junk food and needed to cut down to a strict diet plan. This project explores the nutritional values of the diet and presents it in a contrasting way, it juxtaposes the dull and boring appearance of the food I was eating by presenting the data using colourful vibrant foods, which were almost entirely excluded from my diet.” The simplicity of MacEachern’s layouts allow the subject matter to really shine and engage the viewer. Well done. He produced a perfect bound book and poster for the assignment. View the entire book here.

Via ryanmaceachern.com

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Brooklyn-based photographer Jon Feinstein takes an unconventional approach to food photography in one of his latest projects. Rather than some sort of slick, carefully-lit setup, Feinstein has stripped his subjects from their familiar context, by scanning each (still-warm) item on a flatbed scanner. All the while, capturing a fascinating juxtaposition of the both “revolting and mouthwatering” nature of fast food. In his own words, Feinstein explains: “These photographs investigate the love/hate relationship that many Americans have with fast food, and, like many other aspects of popular culture, its ability to be simultaneously seductive and repulsive.”

Via jonfeinstein.com

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