Archives for posts with tag: fresh

What do you get when you unite a talented, young, rebellious artist with discarded artwork? Renaissance paintings that demand a double-take, for one. French artist Blase, aka Blasepheme, has artistic skills rooted in time-honored techniques. But his subversive sense of humor will not allow him to simply restore flea market finds. Blase does much more than that… he scours sales and brings old paintings back to life with fresh concepts and often satirical touches. Some may question a lack of respect for artists who came before him, but Blase can rest easy knowing that he is in the business of resurrecting these otherwise unwanted works, and giving them relevance. Proved by this very post… we’re talking about said paintings from some 3,600 miles away over the internet in 2017! Blase’s work is nothing short of badass, and we applaud not only his artistic prowess but also his defiant spirit.

More artistic renegades here and here and here.

Via blasepheme.com

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While client-driven work can certainly be fulfilling and satisfying in many ways, there’s something to be said for personal projects. Sure, they can be a little indulgent, but the lack of constraints and pressure, at least from outside sources, often yields fantastic results. As designers, the process is sort of freeing, and can lead to good things all around. Argentinian art director and motion designer Javier Tommasi knows this all too well. His ongoing project, Food for Life, showcases the fruits (quite literally) of his unpaid labor. Tommasi has spent months of his free time exploring new techniques to improve the overall quality of his work, and we are totally impressed. Not just with his dedication to the process, but with the caliber of his work. His renderings are amazing, and his sense of composition and lighting really make these pieces sing. Tommasi speaks to the concept, “I love the set design, product photography, 3D animation and I just wanted to make a mix between all stuff I like, giving an artistic touch. So, playing and proving colors, textures and lights, I did the designs. I had the idea to work with stuff to make me feel something natural, fresh, with vivid colors, and I thought in fruits and vegetables. So. I resolved to do set designs with natural and fresh fruits and vegetables adding extra objects with different textures like metal and gold to see the contrast between them.”

Via javitommasi.com and howww.com

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Call us tortured designers, but being exposed to really bad menu design in an otherwise decent establishment can be slightly agonizing. A business lunch with the Barbour crew inevitably ends up being a design critique of the menu (good or bad) upon the first few minutes of being seated. Yes, it’d probably make for a good SNL skit, but in all seriousness, menu design is an important detail that is sometimes missed. That is certainly not the case for this Italian restaurant, Ristorante Firenze, located near, of all places, Frankfurt, Germany. Stuttgart-based designer Sarah Le Donne is tremendously talented, and really shows her design chops with this branding package. We particularly love the typography and adept use of color. Le Donne explains: “After a small refresh of the existing logo, the task was to create a totally new concept and design for menu and wine cards, vouchers, brochures, business cards, letterheads and a website. The idea behind the identity was to lay the focus on the fresh products the restaurant is well known for. Also the classical Italian colors are reinterpreted in a modern way.” Really well done.

More restaurant-related design here and here and here.

Via sarahledonne.com

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When London-based designer Alexander Klement sets a personal design goal, he follows through in a big way. And his Lathe typeface is a shining example. As fellow designers, we understand that typeface design is no easy task. How do you create something fresh and new, when it has been done over and over in so many ways? Klement certainly created something we’ve never seen before. There’s great dimension to his figures, and we love how he explored various textures. Each character also stands quite nicely on its own. In his own words: “I decided not to design a typeface from scratch as there are so many great ones out there I could just add a personal touch to an existing one. I chose Futura as a base typeface for its simple, clean and modern characteristics. I started by creating a base generative extrusion which was applied to each character. Materials were then explored and applied to the characters to give a sense of a real life object.” Well done.

Via alexanderklement.co.uk

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Um, wow. That’s our initial reaction to the impressive work of Paris-based illustrator Helena Hauss. These days, being a fantastic illustrator isn’t necessarily enough to stand out in a very crowded landscape of creative professionals. Hauss finds her sweet spot in her love of the color blue. A good portion of her work is done with blue ballpoint pens, and the results are stunning. Hauss is detail oriented, and it shows. Hauss explains, “I draw very large pieces of art (usually around 100cm x 70cm) that allow me to really go into details of hair, patterns and typography, all in Bic pens, with bright and contrasted colors. My style of drawing has never been something quite conscious. It just kind of happened, for different reasons that had nothing to do with choice. For example, I have always had a big attraction for the color blue, so much so that all my clothes and accessories were a shade of it, so when I drew I very much liked using blue ink, such as the one found in Bic pens.” Her style is fresh, and her abilities are amazing. We love her work and expect to see more from her in the future.

Via helenahauss.net

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Sometimes you’ll find excellent examples of experimental typography in the most unexpected places. Take this terrific print ad from a Lithuanian grocer, for example. Under the art direction of Lithuanian designer Ignas Kozlovas by way of McCann Erickson, this typographic arrangement of real produce displays mastery in Photoshop, as well as an excellent eye for composition. Really well executed… would love to see the rest of the alphabet. Some other examples of produce in design here and here and here.

Via Behance

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