Archives for posts with tag: Froot Loops

In case you’re not aware, there’s a new niche of photography on the rise, “smartphone photography”. With Apple’s recent announcement of yet more improvements to the already outstanding iPhone camera, this new brand of photography should come as no surprise. Though smartphone cameras don’t (yet) rival the quality of digital SLRs, they have come a long way, and there’s something to be said for their accessibility and convenience. So, it’s no wonder visual artists are compelled to simply reach in their pocket when it’s time to capture some creative brilliance. New Jersey-based visual artist/photographer/college student Adam Hillman is a perfect example. While the quality of his conceptual thinking and execution are rooted in traditional visual art as we know it, part of what defines Hillman’s work is his use of his smartphone. For one, his photos are unedited… what you see is what you get. And with a broadcast vehicle (the great big internet) basically integrated into his tool of choice (smartphone), the accessibility of his work is a key part of its appeal. Hillman’s appreciation for modern art is clear, and his use of color and order are a real draw for us (see previous posts here and here and here). We will be interested to see how Hillman’s work evolves over time. From the look of it, he will be making a name for himself well beyond these early works.

Via Instagram

hillman-01 hillman-02 hillman-03 hillman-04 hillman-05 hillman-06 hillman-07 hillman-08 hillman-09 hillman-10 hillman-11 hillman-12 hillman-13 hillman-14 hillman-15 hillman-16 hillman-17 hillman-18 hillman-19 hillman-20 hillman-21 hillman-22 hillman-23 hillman-24 hillman-25 hillman-26 hillman-27 hillman-28 hillman-29

Advertisements

We must admit, we have a certain fascination with messy things. There are definitely scholarly psychological studies on the matter, but our armchair psychologist observation falls somewhere in the realm of an innate human interest in discomfort, and how a visual mess makes one feel. While some are unfazed, others may be repulsed or attracted to a mess. We’re just scratching the surface here, in terms of experiences and the mental processes behind them, but San Diego-based photographer Keith Allen Phillips actually sets forth an intriguing series that got us thinking about this in the first place. Aptly entitled Messy, Phillips’s series verges on the subversive… naked women covered in a variety of messy foods. The results are actually sort of unexpected, and we almost forget about the food aspect, and focus instead on the mess, and how the models must feel (is it titillating, liberating, frustrating?). This thought-provoking series really does bring up so many feelings, exemplifying the true power of art.

Via keithallenphillips.com

Phillips-01 Phillips-02 Phillips-03 Phillips-04 Phillips-05 Phillips-06 Phillips-07 Phillips-08 Phillips-09 Phillips-10 Phillips-11 Phillips-12 Phillips-13 Phillips-14 Phillips-15 Phillips-16 Phillips-17 Phillips-18

%d bloggers like this: