Archives for posts with tag: funny

We’re not exactly sure of its origins, but perhaps you’ve heard of the folklore that claims dog owners begin to resemble their precious pooches over time. Hamburg, Germany-based freelance portrait, editorial and commercial photographer Ines Opifanti explores this notion in her ongoing series entitled The Dog People. While she’s not exactly sold on that claim, Opifanti does subscribe to the belief that owners become really good at interpreting their pets’ subtle mannerisms. We think Opifanti is really on to something with this… great series that could truly go on and on. It should be noted that these are authentic pairings of pet and owner, not models. Strong concept aside, Opifanti is clearly a very skilled photographer. Really nice shots. We love this all around.

More pet portraiture posts here and here.

Via ines-opifanti.com

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The work of Foot Footie Boy is just simple fun. No, this is not high-brow art, or particularly intellectual or socially conscious. New Delhi-based aspiring artist Uttam Sinha has more than a foot fetish. He seems to see the world in a different light. Armed with nothing more than his phone and vivid imagination, Sinha adds sketches to photos of people’s feet. Okay, sounds sorta weird, even creepy, but it really is creative and fun. These simple composite works actually tell stories, and would probably make a terrific little coffee table book.

Via Facebook

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While we generally appreciate 3D rendering and the technology behind it, we must admit that extraneous use of it (which is rather rampant) is not only irritating from a conceptual standpoint, but also has a general desensitizing effect. So we were surprised and delighted to come across the work of Athens, Greece-based architect Katerina Kamprani. Her ongoing series, fittingly titled The Uncomfortable, explores the redesign of useful objects to make them uncomfortable to use. Kamprani purposefully and thoughtfully reworks each item in twisted ways. She states. “[I] decided to create and design for all the wrong reasons. Vindictive and nasty? Or a helpful study of everyday objects?” Whatever the motivation, we love staring at these, imagining how (un)useful each object would be, and the depraved humor that would ensue. We salute Kamprani for designing with purpose and humor, nicely done.

Some more stellar 3D work here and here and here.

Via kkstudio.gr

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Continuing the theme of our fantastic experience at Create Upstate last week in Syracuse (previous post here), we’d like to introduce you to Curtis Canham of CSA Creative Studio. Canham is an art director/designer/educator based in the Albany area with an impressive and diverse portfolio, from sophisticated packaging to illustration-driven infographics to consumer-facing web design. Along with running a full service design studio, Canham also finds the time to educate the next generation of designers as a design professor at The Center for Art and Design at The College of Saint Rose in Albany. With all of this important work, Canham, believe it or not, is also working on publishing a fundamental typography book. Busy guy, indeed. Last week, Canham ran a table in the marketplace at Create Upstate extolling the virtues of a-holes that quickly caught our attention. A-holes? What the what!? Canham drew us in with his impassioned discourse about his forthcoming book, A-holes: A Type Book. He enlightened us on such things as the anatomy of a-holes, historic a-holes, famous a-holes. and families of a-holes. All of this perceived potty talk may elicit gasps from those who don’t know any better. But being the typography nerds that we are, we, of course, understand and appreciate the double entendre. Aside from the obvious, an a-hole is also the negative space, or counter, within the “A” characters. Canham’s book taps right into a brand of humor we Barbour folk love. With only 5 days left, Canham is in the home stretch of a Kickstarter campaign to fund a first printing of his 130-page book. Don’t be an a-hole… pledge a few bucks, please.

Via csacreativestudio.com and Kickstarter

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Gabe was particularly taken with all of this, and his name was fittingly drawn for an A-hole t-shirt at Create Upstate! In his own words, “you are what you wear.” Bahahahahaha!

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When it comes to an art medium we can really sink our teeth into, food is near the top of our list. After all, few things bring people together like food. It’s relatable, familiar, often comforting, and let’s face it, essential to our very being. Philadelphia-based photographer Dominic Episcopo invites viewers to “Meat America” through this engaging and polarizing series of photographs of, well, meat — carved, molded, manipulated — to look like American icons. Episcopo describes the project as “an eye-opening and artery-closing tour of America’s spirit of entrepreneurship, rebellion and positivity.” From Elvis, to Lincoln, to the Liberty Bell as subjects, Episcopo’s carnivorous wit shines through. And his photography skills are not too shabby either. Patriotic protein aside, Episcopo’s sense of composition and lighting is stellar. A less skilled photographer would not have pulled this off so well. Episcopo’s book available here.

More food art here and here and here.

Via meatamerica.com

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Using toilet paper rolls in craft projects is pretty common in the elementary school set. But not so much in the art world. Paris-based sculptor/paper artist Junior Fritz Jacquet defies convention with these remarkably expressive masks. Each made from a single toilet paper roll masterfully manipulated by Jacquet, this set of 40 masks is really something to behold. Inspired by the traditional art of origami, Jacquet sculpts the cardboard by hand, then applies pigment and shellac. Just terrific.

Via juniorfritzjacquet.com and matthieugauchet.fr

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On the heels of the 87th Annual Academy Awards, we can’t help but feature this funny compilation of parodied clips featuring kids reenacting scenes from this year’s Best Picture nominees (American Sniper, The Grand Budapest Hotel, The Imitation Game, The Theory of Everything, Birdman, Selma, Boyhood and Whiplash). Directed by Los Angeles-based producer/director Ethan Cushing for CineFix, “Kid Oscars 2015” is comical and awkward all at the same time (just picture child actors impersonating Martin Luther King Jr. and Stephen Hawking). It’s all in good fun, and highly entertaining.

Via YouTube

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Doodles are often thought of as rough and incomplete, but these by Bangladesh-based cartoonist/photographer/designer twin brothers known as simply Manik and Ratan are far from that. In fact, they stand alone as happy little works that make us smile. For an added level of engagement, Manik and Ratan’s cartoon characters actually interact with real-life objects, bringing these mainly black and white doodles to life.

More doodle/sketch posts here and here and here.

Via Instagram

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The holiday season really is a time to honor tradition, and that manifests itself in different ways for different people. For us creative folk, it often involves producing some sort of holiday greeting. And for British photographer Peter Thorpe, it also involves his beloved dog Raggle (and a handsome food incentive as payment). For over twenty years, Thorpe has concocted increasingly elaborate holiday photos starring his (very cooperative) pet pooch, who he transforms through the use of good old fashioned costumes and staging (no Photoshop here). Imaginative, fun and inspiring work. Well done!

Via Blogspot

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It’s no secret that we’re really taken with work of Minneapolis-based art director/photographer/designer/creative genius Brock Davis (see previous posts here and here). Davis has an uncanny ability to transform everyday objects into something unexpected. Sometimes playful, or funny, or irreverent, or random, or plain silly… always a stroke of brilliance. This time, though, we stumbled upon his Instagram account, rather than his portfolio site. Davis delights his over 175,000 followers with semi-frequent visual gems… creative and thought-provoking mini installations sure to at least invoke a smile.

Via Instagram

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