Archives for posts with tag: generative

This is already the second time in a few months that we’ve posted about the work of Barcelona-based artist Sergio Albiac (previous post here). We are so taken with his work, which firmly addresses the notion that creativity and technology and science are not mutually exclusive, that we just had to share. In this series, Stardust, Albiac again explores technological processes to create generative works of art. The methodology behind this is admittedly over our heads, but the results are certainly impressive. Albiac basically uses images from the Hubble Space Telescope to compose portraits based on the concept of nucleosynthesis. He even solicited internet participation, which resulted in more than 15,000 works. In his own words, Albiac explains: “As a theme for this series of portraits, I’ve choosen the concept of nucleosynthesis or the process of creation of new atomic nuclei from pre-existing matter that takes place at cosmic scale. We humans, are believed to be novel combinations of cosmic stardust. It could be argued that the whole universe is the biggest running generative art installation today.”

Via sergioalbiac.com

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Collage work, though we’ve all created some form of it from an early age, is way more difficult than it looks… especially at a masterful level of fine art. Barcelona-based artist Sergio Albiac is one such master, who marries traditional media and generative computer code in unexpected ways. Albiac’s series “You are not in the news” explores the relationship between self-worth and media exposure. These compositions are striking, to say the least. And a glimpse into Albiac’s process makes them that much more special. In his own words: “When I code a generative sketch, I introduce control (the sentences that govern the sketching action) and also a degree of randomness in the code. This is a machine control/randomness balance. Then, I select certain outputs (again, human control) and I paint a canvas using the selected generative images as an starting point, without the aim of exact reproduction. The act of painting is a struggle between control and randomness because, depending of the painting technique, paint behavior cannot be totally controlled by the painter. In this way, I explore a fascinating “dialogue” between control/randomness and machine/human interaction. It makes sense to me. I feel connected to artistic tradition but using the generative sketchbook process, I can create in a very contemporary and innovative way that deeply reflects the ideas I need to express.” Just brilliant

Previous post about a very different approach to generative art here. And more collage work here.

Via sergioalbiac.com

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Brooklyn-based sculptor Tara Donovan is known for transforming large volumes of everyday objects into incredible, impactful works. The sheer scope of her work seems to defy the laws of nature; piling, layering and bundling in almost organic forms that seem to bring to mind natural systems. These photos probably don’t even do her work justice. Donovan’s many accolades include the prestigious MacArthur Foundation “Genius” Award, among many others.

Via pacegallery.com

 

Photo 1: pins, toothpicks, glass; photo 2: adding machine paper; photos 3-4: buttons and glue; photos 5-6: polyester film; photos 7-8: styrofoam cups and glue; photo 9: pencils; photos 10-11: plastic drinking straws; photos 12-13: plastic cups

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