Archives for posts with tag: geography

Initially drawn in by typographic papercraft, we quickly realized the portfolio of Lobulo was a treasure trove if dynamic designs. Splitting time between London and Barcelona, Lobulo Design is actually just one man: Javier Rodríguez García. His penchant for working with paper has gained him much respect, and even a viral following online. The well-produced short videos he posts on social media give a nice behind-the-scenes glimpse at Lobule in action, feeding that central hunger for all-access documentation (see some below). The intricacy of Lobulo’s work is striking, and his sense of color and space outstanding. We especially appreciate work that is outside of our comfort zone, and this certainly falls into that category. Just awesome.

Via lobulodesign.com

Lobulo-01 Lobulo-02 Lobulo-03 Lobulo-04 Lobulo-05 Lobulo-06 Lobulo-07 Lobulo-08 Lobulo-09 Lobulo-10 Lobulo-11 Lobulo-12 Lobulo-13 Lobulo-14

Our love of food here at Barbour is no secret. In fact, it’s a requirement. So we pose the question, is there anything better than this project? Actually initiated by the 8-year-old son of New York City area-based writer/designer/blogger Chris Durso, The Foodnited States of America is a deliciously terrific tour of the U.S. Sure, there have been plenty of food-geography mashups (here and here), but this one is different. The “punny” play on words sells it, and the superb execution knocks it out of the park. Durso rolls out states one-by-one on his Instagram page (hashtag #foodnitedstates), and he’s just passed the halfway mark. This is one to watch, folks. Sampling below, but be sure to head over to Durso’s Instagram for more.

Via Instagram and foodiggity.com

Durso-01 Durso-02 Durso-03 Durso-04 Durso-05 Durso-06 Durso-07 Durso-08 Durso-09 Durso-10

It’s no secret that we at Barbour are bunch of foodies of some degree or another, so we can’t resist food concepts that are really well executed. And this series, by New Zealand-born, Brooklyn-based photographer/artist Henry Hargreaves (see a previous post of his work here) is a perfect example. In his own words, Hargreaves explains: “In this series we have taken many of the iconic foods of countries and continents and turned them into physical maps. While we know that tomatoes originally came from the Andes in South America, Italy has become the tomato king. These maps show how food has traveled the globe—transforming and becoming a part of the cultural identity of that place. Who doesn’t know the saying “throw some shrimp on the barbie” and not think of Australia? Who goes to France without eating bread and cheese? And who makes a Brazilian caipirinha without a fistful of limes?” Hargreaves collaborated with food stylist Caitlin Levin and graphic designer Sarit Melmed to painstakingly create maps made out of foods that embody each location. We love the various textures, colors and cultural references. As well as the marriage of cartography, typography and gastronomy. Outstanding on many levels! Prints available here.

Via henryhargreaves.com and Facebook

Hargreaves-01 Hargreaves-02 Hargreaves-03 Hargreaves-04 Hargreaves-05 Hargreaves-06 Hargreaves-07 Hargreaves-08 Hargreaves-09 Hargreaves-10 Hargreaves-11 Hargreaves-12 Hargreaves-13 Hargreaves-14 Hargreaves-15 Hargreaves-16 Hargreaves-17 Hargreaves-18

%d bloggers like this: