Archives for posts with tag: geometric shapes

Having a close relationship with marketing at ESPN, we see (and create ourselves) lots of sports-related designs. We recently came across the work of a young Texas-based designer by the name of Nick Bascus. His growing portfolio as a whole has a very nice aesthetic, and he has a clear grasp of graphic design fundamentals like color and typography. But the work that really shines is Bascus’s series of low-polygon illustrations and posters featuring some current NBA stars. These killer designs hit all the right notes, from composition to color choices. Bascus could easily expand on this series with great success, and we honestly hope to see his work on the pages of ESPN The Magazine (nudge, nudge… @espnmag) someday soon.

Via nickbascus.com

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The connection between mathematics and art dates back thousands of years. From cathedrals to ancient tilings to oriental rugs, mathematics have been fundamental in geometric designs that are now revered and often emulated. In honor of Common Core testing that is taking place here in New York State this week, we thought it fitting to look at the work of Iranian mathematical artist Hamid Naderi Yeganeh. These often delicately intricate works are quite remarkable, and more astounding is that Yeganeh writes computer programs based on mathematical equations to produce them. Though Yeganeh’s mathematical descriptions are way over our heads (example below), the aesthetic and conceptual allure of these works is certainly not lost on us. The results are stunning, and just proof that math can be beautiful.

Via mathematics.culturalspot.org

 

This first image shows 9,000 ellipses. For each k=1,2,3,…,9000 the foci of the k-th ellipse are:
A(k)+iB(k)+C(k)e^(300πik/9000)
and
A(k)+iB(k)-C(k)e^(300πik/9000)
and the eccentricity of the k-th ellipse is D(k), where
A(k)=sin(12πk/9000)cos(8πk/9000),
B(k)=cos(12πk/9000)cos(8πk/9000),
C(k)=(1/14)+(1/16)sin(10πk/9000),
D(k)=(49/50)-(1/7)(sin(10πk/9000))^4.

Yeganeh-01Yeganeh-02 Yeganeh-03Yeganeh-06 Yeganeh-04 Yeganeh-05  Yeganeh-07 Yeganeh-08 Yeganeh-09 Yeganeh-10Yeganeh-11

Cubism, widely considered the most influential art movement of the 20th century, was pioneered by Picasso and Braque in the early 1900s. By definition, cubism is a style and movement in which perspective with a single viewpoint was abandoned and use was made of simple geometric shapes, interlocking planes, and even collage. Dutch artist Enno de Kroon takes this one step further, using the unique landscape of the universal egg carton to his advantage in what he calls “eggcubism”. de Kroon had always experimented with distortions of perspective, and he found that the egg carton as his canvas presented a new and unique challenge that forced him to approach painting in a new way. The challenge is not only limited to de Kroon as the creator, but the viewer’s perception is also challenged. de Kroon explains, “The waves of the egg cartons limit the viewer’s perception; they also make him aware of his positioning towards the image. The intentional limitation in subjective perception gives room for imagination and recall: the process of occlusion. By a fusion of direct and indirect perception conventional imagery is overtaken. At first sight this leads to a physical and mental incompleteness, that forces an integration which can only take place within the inner experience, apart from time and space. One could say that the complete image just emerges sublimated in the viewers mind. Gestalt psychology states that human perception aims for completeness. Perceptions are being added subconsciously. My eggcubist works evoke conscious and dynamic adding. The objects not only refer to themselves, they also refer to each other as a series.” In a digital age of augmented reality and immersive 3D experiences, de Kroon’s eggcubism pays homage to traditional cubism, with an interactive twist.

Via ennodekroon.nl and Flickr

deKroon-01 deKroon-02 deKroon-03 deKroon-04 deKroon-05 deKroon-06 deKroon-07 deKroon-08 deKroon-09 deKroon-10 deKroon-11 deKroon-12 deKroon-13 deKroon-14 deKroon-15 deKroon-16 deKroon-17 deKroon-18 deKroon-19 deKroon-20 deKroon-21 deKroon-22 deKroon-23 deKroon-24

A few days ago we stumbled upon this fun project by Palo Alto-based designers Jeremiah Shaw and Danny Jones. We know very little about it, but seems to be as advertised… a daily exercise in exploration of geometric shapes and form. It has yielded some really cool work, particularly the series of planets.

Via geoaday.tumblr.com

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