Archives for posts with tag: glass

We’ve seen art created from a wide variety of media, but nothing quite like this. As a matter of fact, if you had to guess how these were created just by looking at them, you’d probably have a hard time figuring it out. Relying on little more than brown packing tape, an Xacto and the filtering of light behind a translucent surface, Amsterdam-based artist Max Zorn’s work is awe-inspiring. The nuance in shading he achieves by layering tape is astounding all on its own. Never mind Zorn’s ability to manipulate the tape so intricately. It’s interesting how these works, composed of such an unexpected and artless material, are so beautiful. Zorn clearly has a penchant for the past, as indicated by his choice of subjects for the majority of his work. Interestingly, Zorn’s fondness for packing tape began as street art, as he describes in his own words: “There’s a lot of great street art by day, but it disappears after dark. I wanted to come up with urban art that uses nighttime as a setting, and there was nothing more inviting than the street lamps in Amsterdam. In the beginning I used packing tape to fill in larger sections of my marker drawings. Once I hung them on street lamps, the light’s effect opened up new ideas with ditching markers and just using tape.”

Via maxzorn.com and YouTube

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In case you’re not aware, there’s a new niche of photography on the rise, “smartphone photography”. With Apple’s recent announcement of yet more improvements to the already outstanding iPhone camera, this new brand of photography should come as no surprise. Though smartphone cameras don’t (yet) rival the quality of digital SLRs, they have come a long way, and there’s something to be said for their accessibility and convenience. So, it’s no wonder visual artists are compelled to simply reach in their pocket when it’s time to capture some creative brilliance. New Jersey-based visual artist/photographer/college student Adam Hillman is a perfect example. While the quality of his conceptual thinking and execution are rooted in traditional visual art as we know it, part of what defines Hillman’s work is his use of his smartphone. For one, his photos are unedited… what you see is what you get. And with a broadcast vehicle (the great big internet) basically integrated into his tool of choice (smartphone), the accessibility of his work is a key part of its appeal. Hillman’s appreciation for modern art is clear, and his use of color and order are a real draw for us (see previous posts here and here and here). We will be interested to see how Hillman’s work evolves over time. From the look of it, he will be making a name for himself well beyond these early works.

Via Instagram

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When London-based designer Alexander Klement sets a personal design goal, he follows through in a big way. And his Lathe typeface is a shining example. As fellow designers, we understand that typeface design is no easy task. How do you create something fresh and new, when it has been done over and over in so many ways? Klement certainly created something we’ve never seen before. There’s great dimension to his figures, and we love how he explored various textures. Each character also stands quite nicely on its own. In his own words: “I decided not to design a typeface from scratch as there are so many great ones out there I could just add a personal touch to an existing one. I chose Futura as a base typeface for its simple, clean and modern characteristics. I started by creating a base generative extrusion which was applied to each character. Materials were then explored and applied to the characters to give a sense of a real life object.” Well done.

Via alexanderklement.co.uk

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Brooklyn-based sculptor Tara Donovan is known for transforming large volumes of everyday objects into incredible, impactful works. The sheer scope of her work seems to defy the laws of nature; piling, layering and bundling in almost organic forms that seem to bring to mind natural systems. These photos probably don’t even do her work justice. Donovan’s many accolades include the prestigious MacArthur Foundation “Genius” Award, among many others.

Via pacegallery.com

 

Photo 1: pins, toothpicks, glass; photo 2: adding machine paper; photos 3-4: buttons and glue; photos 5-6: polyester film; photos 7-8: styrofoam cups and glue; photo 9: pencils; photos 10-11: plastic drinking straws; photos 12-13: plastic cups

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New York-based artist Daniel Arsham has been exploring the use of broken glass in some if his latest work. These striking sculptures are built with broken shards of glass, which are compacted and held together with resin. We also love the cameras he sculpted from sand and stone. There is something to be said for the art of manipulating simple materials in new and unexpected ways, and Arsham’s work is certainly evidence of that.

Via danielarsham.com

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