Archives for posts with tag: government

When it comes to an art medium we can really sink our teeth into, food is near the top of our list. After all, few things bring people together like food. It’s relatable, familiar, often comforting, and let’s face it, essential to our very being. Philadelphia-based photographer Dominic Episcopo invites viewers to “Meat America” through this engaging and polarizing series of photographs of, well, meat — carved, molded, manipulated — to look like American icons. Episcopo describes the project as “an eye-opening and artery-closing tour of America’s spirit of entrepreneurship, rebellion and positivity.” From Elvis, to Lincoln, to the Liberty Bell as subjects, Episcopo’s carnivorous wit shines through. And his photography skills are not too shabby either. Patriotic protein aside, Episcopo’s sense of composition and lighting is stellar. A less skilled photographer would not have pulled this off so well. Episcopo’s book available here.

More food art here and here and here.

Via meatamerica.com

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At first glance, one might deduce that this series of vivid, eye-catching photos is for some high-brow fashion campaign, or conceptual art project. Much to our surprise and delight, they are actually part of a bold print and outdoor advertising campaign from a few years back, entitled Adaptation, for, of all things, Barcelona City Council. That’s right, government, more or less. Shot by acclaimed Spanish photographer Paco Peregrín, and art directed by London-based Conor Cronin, this campaign is so different from what we’d expect from anything remotely bureaucratic, that’s it’s certainly attention getting, and even slightly refreshing. Could you even imagine a campaign like this for your local city council? Perhaps Spaniards are more culturally and artistically evolved. Or maybe the aesthetic sophistication juxtaposed with a purpose, though noble, rather mundane, was exactly the point. Either way, we’re talking about it thousands of miles away, and that is impressive by any measure.

Via pacoperegrin.com and conorcronin.com

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The faces on U.S. bank notes are so ubiquitous that we barely notice them anymore. But San Francisco-based artist James Charles is intimately familiar with the intricacies of U.S. currency portraits. Charles is a mixed media artist with an array of talents, one of which is illustrative portraiture. By sort of a happy accident — he began drawing on dollar bills for fun… what he calls “self-amusement” — Charles altered presidents’ faces in all sorts of ways. Before long, he had an incredible series that continues to grow. His attention to detail is nothing short of incredible, even modifying the lettering along the bottom of the note with the title of each piece. The subject matter ranges, which is part of the brilliance of this series as a whole. Though he never explicitly states it, Charles seems to be using his art as commentary for how pop culture is such a driving force in American economics today.

Via 333portraits.com and shootinggallerysf.com

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