Archives for posts with tag: gradient

On this Earth Day, we thought it appropriate to feature work that promotes that trendy buzz word: upcycling. In other words, reusing objects that would otherwise be discarded in such a way as to create something of higher quality or value than the original. In this case, it’s the inventive work of UK photographer Dan Tobin Smith. For his project entitled The First Law of Kipple, Smith basically collected a very wide array of rubbish, then painstakingly chromatically arranged it with such attention, that he achieved pleasing gradients from color to color (no Photoshop filters here, folks). And we’re not talking a handful of objects, but thousands upon thousands. What’s this peculiar word “kipple”, you ask? It’s actually a fictional word that was coined by science fiction writer Philip K. Dick in his 1968 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (the film adaptation was Blade Runner), and is used to describe useless, pointless stuff that humans accumulate. It’s sort of odd even saying it, but Smith’s creative display of such junk is quite beautiful and thought-provoking. This project certainly appeals to our own nerdy desire for order and color harmony.

More chromatic-centric posts here and here and here.

Via dantobinsmith.com and Instagram

Smith-01 Smith-02 Smith-03 Smith-04 Smith-05 Smith-06 Smith-07 Smith-08 Smith-09 Smith-10 Smith-11 Smith-12

Advertisements

Food and color are two of our favorite things… combine that with very systematic arrangements, and we’re in seventh heaven. So when we stumbled upon the work of Seattle-based photographer/food fanatic Brittany Wright, we were immediately taken with her stunning compositions. Wright not only arranges fruit and vegetables in a spectrum that’s pleasing to the eye, but she also captures changes through the aging process, and sometimes cooking. Her approach is actually less like food photography, and more abstract. Wright’s terrific sense of color is clear in her very nuanced groupings. She has even branched out from fresh produce, and started exploring other types of foods too. Wright’s work appeals to us on a variety of levels, and if her growing number of Instagram followers is any indication, we’re not alone in that.

More orderly food photography here and here and here.

Via wrightkitchen.com and Instagram

Wright-01 Wright-02 Wright-03 Wright-04 Wright-05 Wright-06 Wright-07 Wright-08 Wright-09 Wright-10 Wright-11 Wright-12 Wright-13 Wright-14 Wright-15 Wright-16 Wright-17 Wright-18 Wright-19 Wright-20 Wright-21 Wright-22 Wright-23 Wright-24 Wright-25 Wright-26 Wright-27 Wright-28 Wright-29 Wright-30

%d bloggers like this: