Archives for posts with tag: highly detailed

The (fleeting) art of pumpkin carving has certainly grown in popularity in recent years, partly due to increased exposure on social media, plus the rise of competitive television programs like Food Network’s Halloween Wars. Once called “the Picasso of Pumpkin Carving”, Arizona-based artist Ray Villafane finds himself in peak pumpkin season on this October 31, so we thought it fitting to take a look at his awe-inspiring work. Villafane, who naturally competed on Halloween Wars in its debut season back in 2011, is one of the most high-profile pumpkin carvers around, and for good reason. His work in a medium that is unfortunately very temporary is incredible on so many levels. From concept to execution, Villafane’s creations go well beyond the ubiquitous jack-o-lantern. In the hands of Villafane and company (collectively called Villafane Studios), these ghoulish gourds come to life with remarkable details and truly lifelike expression. We dare you to peruse through these few examples of his extraordinary work without an expression of utter wonderment and admiration. More spine-chilling posts here and here and here. Happy Halloween!

Via villafanestudios.com and Facebook

villafane-01 villafane-02 villafane-03 villafane-04 villafane-05 villafane-06 villafane-07 villafane-08 villafane-09 villafane-10 villafane-11 villafane-12 villafane-13 villafane-14 villafane-15 villafane-16 villafane-17 villafane-18 villafane-19 villafane-20 villafane-21 villafane-22 villafane-23

Movie buffs rejoice! While we certainly love movies, we are more excited about this incredible series of posters from a design and conceptual perspective. German multidisciplinary design studio Stellavie, in collaboration with illustrator/artist Julian Rentzsch, hit the mark with this superb series of prints paying homage to some of the foremost movie directors in history. Each piece features the director’s portrait as the focal point, with an array of references from some of their impressive body of work. Each composition is quite beautiful with really thoughtful details, and we especially love the traditional movie credit typography incorporated into each layout. Each edition is limited to 200 copies each, and they are signed and numbered, and printed with museum-quality inks on textured, acid-free cotton paper (available for purchase here). Fantastic work on may levels. Bravo.

More killer movie designs here and here and here.

Via stellavie.com and julianrentzsch.de

Stellavie-01 Stellavie-02 Stellavie-03 Stellavie-04 Stellavie-05 Stellavie-06 Stellavie-07 Stellavie-08 Stellavie-09 Stellavie-10 Stellavie-11 Stellavie-12 Stellavie-13 Stellavie-14 Stellavie-15 Stellavie-16 Stellavie-17 Stellavie-18 Stellavie-19 Stellavie-20 Stellavie-21 Stellavie-22

Wood probably would not be a sculptor’s first choice to replicate ripples in clothing, flowing strands of hair, or someone emerging from water in a bikini after a swim. But Italian artist Peter Demetz sees no limits in his material of choice, which is what makes his work so remarkable. The incredibly lifelike details are truly awe-inspiring. Demetz’s familiarity with human anatomy, and his ability to transform a material that seems so rigid and inanimate is like nothing we’re ever seen. Also notable is Demetz’s sense of composition. Most of the figures’ backs are facing the viewer, often in some pensive moment that feels a bit sad and poignant through the authentic body language Demetz achieves with an almost photographic quality. Needless to say, Demetz is an immensely talented sculptor.

Be sure to check out the video below too… though it’s not in English, it gives a good sense of scale and process. Truly stunning.

Via peterdemetz.it

Demetz-01 Demetz-02 Demetz-03 Demetz-04 Demetz-05 Demetz-06 Demetz-07 Demetz-08 Demetz-09 Demetz-10 Demetz-11 Demetz-12 Demetz-13 Demetz-14 Demetz-15 Demetz-16 Demetz-17

It is said that patience is a virtue. And French artists/designers Xavier Casalta and Rémy Boiré are just oozing with it. Casalta’s specialty is pointillism, a technique in which small, distinct dots are applied in patterns to form an image. Boiré is a masterful hand-letterer, whose line work is impeccable. Together they created this phenomenal piece. Clocking in over 300 hours of patience and discipline, Casalta’s and Boiré’s passion for highly detailed design could not be more evident. Not only is this a great example of seamless collaboration, but also of deliberate forethought and planning, as well as hand craftsmanship in an increasingly digital design landscape. Just incredible.

Via casaltaxavier.com and remyboire.fr

Patience-01 Patience-02 Patience-03 Patience-04 Patience-05 Patience-06 Patience-07 Patience-08 Patience-09 Patience-10 Patience-11 Patience-12 Patience-13 Patience-14 Patience-15

We really like the commitment of promising young UK designer Thomas Wightman. Showcased here are two school projects by the recent grad. That’s right, school projects. Wightman aimed high with these tremendously conceptual sculptures, and executed them with perfection. The intricate details are truly astounding. The objective of the assignments (aptly titled The Medium is the Message) was to visually interpret a theme (Wightman chose addiction, with a focus on obsessive driven addictions) through a chosen medium. In his own words, Wightman explains the medium he selected and the meaning behind his first piece: “The book firstly is closed hiding the addiction from view in the same manner as those who hide these addictions from loved ones and friends. However when the book is opened it reveals the chaotic emotions felt. Panic attacks are heavily associated with Obsessive Compulsive disorder and I wanted to convey this through the metaphor of a sinking ship in a vortex drowning from the obsession. Also the symptoms of a panic attack include loss of breath in the same way as drowning in water. However I wanted to add the anchor and typographic rope showing these problems can be solved and the ship can be saved in the same way as those who suffer from OCD when they receive proper treatment.”

For his second book sculpture, Plagued by Doubt, Wightman delved a little deeper into the emotion associated with living with OCD. Wightman explains: “I wanted to convey this idea by making a plague of insects. I decided on moths because I wanted to suggest that the book has been hidden and left, and the moths have eaten away at the pages of the book. This shows that if you don’t seek treatment for OCD, it can become both physically and mentally damaging. Also, typography was used to show the idea that these moths have made a nest within the book – representative of the fact that OCD is usually with a person for life. It lives within and is not noticed until the book is opened, releasing the moths and solving the problem to demonstrate that with proper help, OCD can be treated.” Conceptually and aesthetically beautiful.

More book-related posts here and here and here.

Via Blogspot

Wightman-1 Wightman-2 Wightman-3 Wightman-4 Wightman-5 Wightman-6 Wightman-7 Wightman-8 Wightman-9

Cape Town artist, and self-described miniaturist, Lorraine Loots is big on talent. Back in January 2013 Loots began painting a miniature piece each day, aptly naming the project 365 Paintings for Ants. And when we say miniature, we mean minuscule… some are barely as large as one’s thumbnail. Her love for detail, however, is not at all diminutive and does not suffer in the least by the very small scale of her works. With little more than pencils, extremely fine paint brushes and a magnifying glass, Loots creates a unique work of art each day. For the first iteration of the project in 2013 her subjects were decidedly random. From something that pertained to her day, to a special event for a particular date, to even suggestions by others. Loots explains: “I see it as a kind of an interactive project. I’m definitely not the tortured artist sitting in a corner expressing my emotions. I’m influenced by everything around me.” For 2014, Loots decided to focus on Cape Town, in honor of its distinction of being named World Design Capital by the International Council of Societies of Industrial Design (ICSID) for its dedication to using design for social, cultural and economic development. Loots sells each original framed painting, as well as a very limited run of archival prints. Not only are her artistic skills prodigious, her entrepreneurial spirit is also impressive. Be sure to also check out the beautifully produced video below. We look forward to the project’s evolution for the coming year!

Via lorraineloots.com

Loots-01 Loots-02 Loots-03 Loots-04 Loots-05 Loots-06 Loots-07 Loots-08 Loots-09 Loots-10 Loots-11 Loots-12 Loots-13 Loots-14 Loots-15 Loots-16 Loots-17 Loots-18Loots-19

In this age of computer-aided design and art, we have a certain appreciation for good old pencil to paper. And if some of our past posts are any indication (here and here and here), we are really taken with what is often referred to as “hyperrealism”. So when we stumbled across the work of self-taught Ukrainian artist Kseniia Rustamova, we just had to share. Though she’s not being commissioned for big budget ad campaigns or high-profile gallery shows (that we know of), Rustamova’s talents in this field seem limitless. The details in her highlights and shadows really define her work… her subjects really pop off the page, and almost appear photographic. Really impressive.

Via rustamova.daportfolio.com

Kseniia-01 Kseniia-02 Kseniia-03 Kseniia-04 Kseniia-05 Kseniia-06 Kseniia-07 Kseniia-08 Kseniia-09 Kseniia-10

The faces on U.S. bank notes are so ubiquitous that we barely notice them anymore. But San Francisco-based artist James Charles is intimately familiar with the intricacies of U.S. currency portraits. Charles is a mixed media artist with an array of talents, one of which is illustrative portraiture. By sort of a happy accident — he began drawing on dollar bills for fun… what he calls “self-amusement” — Charles altered presidents’ faces in all sorts of ways. Before long, he had an incredible series that continues to grow. His attention to detail is nothing short of incredible, even modifying the lettering along the bottom of the note with the title of each piece. The subject matter ranges, which is part of the brilliance of this series as a whole. Though he never explicitly states it, Charles seems to be using his art as commentary for how pop culture is such a driving force in American economics today.

Via 333portraits.com and shootinggallerysf.com

Charles-01 Charles-22 Charles-19 Charles-21 Charles-20 Charles-18 Charles-17 Charles-16 Charles-15 Charles-14 Charles-13 Charles-12 Charles-11 Charles-10 Charles-09 Charles-08 Charles-07 Charles-06 Charles-05 Charles-04 Charles-03 Charles-02

The art of quilling, a technique that involves rolling, shaping and gluing strips of paper to form decorative designs, has been around for literally hundreds of years. Russian-born, UK-based designer and artist Yulia Brodskaya has a masterful handle on the time-honored art form, and brings it into the twenty first century through use in advertising, publishing and even CandyCrush-inspired art and animated replicas of her work (seen here and here and here). Her three-dimensional work is vibrant, highly detailed and really thoughtfully crafted. Brodskaya explains her passion for paper in her own words, “Paper always held a special fascination for me. I’ve tried many deferent methods and techniques of working with it, until I found the way that has turned out to be ‘the one’ for me: now I draw with paper instead of on it”. Brodskaya’s reputation is unmatched, with an impressive list of clients to prove it.

More paper art posts here and here.

Via artyulia.com

Brodskaya-01 Brodskaya-02 Brodskaya-03 Brodskaya-04 Brodskaya-05 Brodskaya-06 Brodskaya-07 Brodskaya-08 Brodskaya-09 Brodskaya-10 Brodskaya-11 Brodskaya-12 Brodskaya-13 Brodskaya-14 Brodskaya-15 Brodskaya-16 Brodskaya-17 Brodskaya-18 Brodskaya-19 Brodskaya-20 Brodskaya-21

%d bloggers like this: