Archives for posts with tag: human body

For most artists, the palette knife is used for mixing paint, and in conjunction with brushes for applying paint. Tehran-based artist Salman Khoshroo eliminates brushes altogether. He applies thick layers of oil paint to his (massive) canvases with an arsenal of palette knives with such deliberate precision. Not only does Khoshroo have a deep visual understanding of the human form, but his sense of color is truly astounding. For an application process that seems so heavy-handed, Khoshroo remarkably uses color in clever and sometimes subtle ways as to establish cohesion in these borderline abstract works. We’d love to see a Bob Ross-style process video by Khoshroo… We find his method and resulting work equally intriguing.

Via salmankhoshroo.com

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Michigan artist and educator Anne Mondro has a fascination with human anatomy, so pairing that interest with her superb crocheting skills was a natural union. Using thin copper and steel wire, Mondro creates beautifully intricate crocheted sculptures of hearts, lungs, limbs, and even entire bodies. In her own words, Mondro states, “My creative work explores the physical and emotional complexity of the human body. Intrigued by the ways the human body is experienced and valued in society, I create sculptures and images that investigate and portray various aspects of humanity. Crocheting (the process of using a hooked needle to pull loops from a continuous thread and working with one stitch at a time) enables the figures to interlace each other physically and metaphorically to express these aspects of humanity. The color and texture of the wire adds to the work by portraying the figures as ethereal silhouettes, evoking associations with mortality and spirituality.” This is not your grandmother’s needlework, that’s for certain.

Via annemondro.com and ceresgallery.org

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Tattoos are often very telling. Each and every one seems to have a story behind it, and for those who are covered, it’s like a novel. British photographer Alan Powdrill brings some of these stories to light, with his latest project and exhibition, aptly titled Covered. Looking at Powdrill’s portfolio as a whole, we love his edginess, which seems to be a common thread. Here, Powdrill features subjects who are literally walking canvases, their bodies covered in ink, underneath their everyday garb. This series presents a nice juxtaposition, and gets our minds racing about the evolution of the indelible artwork for each subject, and which unassuming individuals in our own community might be adorned in tattoos in a similar fashion. Powdrill really gets to the heart of photography here… storytelling is fundamental, and his work is quite poetic. Fascinating project, and very well executed.

Via alanpowdrill.com

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Art and design can be powerful tools to raise awareness and permeate public consciousness. Visual impact can often be more commanding than words alone. Ecuadorian artist Maria Jose Cabezas clearly knows this, and capitalizes on the ability of well-conceived, expertly executed imagery to convey a message. With a global culture steeped in preoccupation with physical appearances, Cabezas’s work here clearly has a place. She sheds light on sensitive issues that rarely get the attention they deserve, like anorexia and bulimia. In her own words, Cabezas hopes to “enlighten the consequences of the obsession with beauty.” This work could not be more relevant, and we really appreciate the merits of Cabezas’s work, not only artistically, but also socially.

Via Behance

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Digital three-dimensional renderings have come a long way. So far, in fact, that it’s often difficult to tell if something is real or rendered. South Korean digital artist/sculptor Kyuin Shim capitalizes on that obscured distinction in his digital sculptures. Focusing on dysmorphic views of the human body, Shim creates these fascinating, and in some ways, disconcerting human forms. There’s a paradox at play here… a certain beauty, yet depravity in the way Shim morphs these figures in unexpected ways.

Via Behance

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