Archives for posts with tag: human

Some of the most moving pieces of art involve the human form. After all, everyone on the planet can relate in some capacity… we are all human. Nature is also an ever-present theme, and artists sometimes explore the relationship between the two. Which is exactly the case for the work of Virginia-based sculptor Christopher David White. But what is really intriguing about White’s incredible body of work is his ability to manipulate perception… in essence, his mastery of illusion (or in art-speak, trompe l’oeil, visual illusion in art, which literally translates to “deceives the eye” from French). Upon inspection, White’s work appears to be intricately sculpted from petrified wood. We might add, if these pieces were sculpted from wood, that would be impressive in and of itself. But these stunning sculptures are actually rendered from clay with an astounding attention to detail. At its core, White’s work is about change. In his own words: “Change is a constant reminder that permanence is the ultimate illusion. It is through the creation of hyper-realistic sculpture that I explore the relationship between nature, man, and the phenomenon of impermanence.”

Via christopherdavidwhite.com

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Michigan artist and educator Anne Mondro has a fascination with human anatomy, so pairing that interest with her superb crocheting skills was a natural union. Using thin copper and steel wire, Mondro creates beautifully intricate crocheted sculptures of hearts, lungs, limbs, and even entire bodies. In her own words, Mondro states, “My creative work explores the physical and emotional complexity of the human body. Intrigued by the ways the human body is experienced and valued in society, I create sculptures and images that investigate and portray various aspects of humanity. Crocheting (the process of using a hooked needle to pull loops from a continuous thread and working with one stitch at a time) enables the figures to interlace each other physically and metaphorically to express these aspects of humanity. The color and texture of the wire adds to the work by portraying the figures as ethereal silhouettes, evoking associations with mortality and spirituality.” This is not your grandmother’s needlework, that’s for certain.

Via annemondro.com and ceresgallery.org

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The worlds of fine art and digital art seem to be very slowly converging. There was a time not long ago when Photoshop “art” did not even exist, and traditional artists and art enthusiasts would have shuddered at even the thought. But technological advances, and out-of-the-box thinking have given rise to digitally produced works that are more than computer generated, but thoughtfully composed using time-honored techniques. Los Angeles-based digital artist and designer Anthony Gargasz is one such artist whose work seems to rise above. Gargasz’s thought-provoking series Metallic Faces takes an organic human form, and imposes mechanical attributes, with great effect, color and contrast. Fine, indeed.

Via anthonygargasz.com

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It’s interesting how some of the most common things can seem obscure with a different point of view. This is certainly the case with Armenian photographer/Renaissance man (he also has a PhD in physics, teaches mathematics and astronomy, and plays a variety of musical instruments) Suren Manvelyan’s series of macro photographs of human eyes called Your Beautiful Eyes. The complexity of the iris is revealed in these remarkable photographs, almost appearing to be some foreign landscape. The intricate fibrous structure of the eye is just breathtaking, and something, ironically enough, we cannot see with our eyes alone. Manvelyan’s lighting is particularly noteworthy… these photos could have been much less impressive in the hands of a less adept photographer. Absolutely beautiful (and almost otherworldly). Be sure to also check out Manvelyan’s animal eye series here and here.

Via surenmanvelyan.com

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Digital three-dimensional renderings have come a long way. So far, in fact, that it’s often difficult to tell if something is real or rendered. South Korean digital artist/sculptor Kyuin Shim capitalizes on that obscured distinction in his digital sculptures. Focusing on dysmorphic views of the human body, Shim creates these fascinating, and in some ways, disconcerting human forms. There’s a paradox at play here… a certain beauty, yet depravity in the way Shim morphs these figures in unexpected ways.

Via Behance

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Though relatively new on the scene of traditional film photography, German photographer Florian Imgrund creates masterful compositions the old school way. Imgrund got his first film camera just four years ago, and has been building an impressive body of work ever since. Employing double exposure techniques in the darkroom, Imgrund often merges beautiful landscapes with human forms… all without any computer manipulation. The results are incredible. Reminiscent of some other double exposure work here.

Via inthoughts.de

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Young, French artist Charlotte Caron works in a variety of media, including painting, sculpture, engraving and photography. Her series of painted portraits is particularly captivating. This unique execution involves painting animal faces over photographed human forms, and serves as commentary about the complexity of human nature, and being part civilized and part wild. Caron cites the theories by Antoine Spire, and also describes this hybrid approach in her own words: “We are both tempted by the humanization of animals, which often reveals our fantasy projections and the bestial men, another way for us to freeze the other in a animality.” “This series of paintings, photographs, tries to give an answer to a form of duality – that assumes an animal part. By the medium of painting in addition, flow, mask, portrait to ultimately create an osmosis between the two mediums, so between the animal and the portrait.”

Via charlottecaron.fr

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