Archives for posts with tag: illustrator

We are compelled to check in on the work of renowned Russian illustrator/graphic designer Eiko Ojala every so often (here and here) because he’s just so good. Ojala’s style is distinct… we now recognize it from a mile away. These are truly mixed media endeavors, mixing digital illustration, paper textures, and both real and artificial shadows. His adept sense of color, composition and depth are hallmarks of his incredible body of work, which includes illustrations for a variety of impressive clients including The New York Times, National Geographic Traveler Magazine, Herman Miller, Harvard Business Review, Scientific American Mind, Ebony Magazine and The New Yorker. Here’s a sampling of some of his more recent work, including a children’s book he recently illustrated (available for purchase here). Enjoy.

Via ploom.tv

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In an effort to come full circle in recognizing the very polarizing Common Core testing in New York over the past two weeks, we bring you another “math meets art” post. This time it’s the work of Venezuelan architect and illustrator Rafael Araujo, and his very technical approach to capturing the mathematical brilliance of nature. With simple drafting tools (pencil, ruler, compass, protractor), Araujo takes much pleasure and pride being unplugged from technology while exploring three dimensionality (yes, without the aid of a computer), which can take up to 100 hours to create a single complex composition. We cannot wrap our brains around how one would even begin to approach this, so needless to say, we are in complete awe of Araujo. As are the thousands of backers who contributed to his Kickstarter campaign to publish a book of his work, which began several months ago with a goal just over $20,000. Araujo has since raised over a quarter of a million dollars to date, with the help of Sydney, Australia-based husband and wife team Melinda and Andres Restrepo. The Restrepos were so taken with Araujo’s work online, they approached him about creating a book. Capitalizing on the growing popularity of “adult coloring books” (c’mon, not X-rated, but those touting supposed “stress relieving” patterns), the project to publish the Golden Ratio Coloring Book is forging ahead. When you look at the sampling of Araujo’s work below, just keep in mind that they are all done by hand. Simply breathtaking.

Via rafael-araujo.com

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Movie buffs rejoice! While we certainly love movies, we are more excited about this incredible series of posters from a design and conceptual perspective. German multidisciplinary design studio Stellavie, in collaboration with illustrator/artist Julian Rentzsch, hit the mark with this superb series of prints paying homage to some of the foremost movie directors in history. Each piece features the director’s portrait as the focal point, with an array of references from some of their impressive body of work. Each composition is quite beautiful with really thoughtful details, and we especially love the traditional movie credit typography incorporated into each layout. Each edition is limited to 200 copies each, and they are signed and numbered, and printed with museum-quality inks on textured, acid-free cotton paper (available for purchase here). Fantastic work on may levels. Bravo.

More killer movie designs here and here and here.

Via stellavie.com and julianrentzsch.de

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Romania-born, New York City-based illustrator/designer/art director Daniel Nyari employs a distinct style of bulbous shapes and bold colors in a geometric and cubist sort of way. And we love it, as do his impressive roster of clients, which includes ESPN, Wired, GQ, Adidas, National Geographic, Microsoft, Men’s Health, among others. Nyari says he wants “to make art that looks like it was made by a computer which thinks it’s human.” His process is methodical and based on a grid, and this thoughtfulness shows. Nyari’s body of work is comprised of a great deal of football (soccer) projects, which is clearly a passion, and derives naturally from his European roots. But make no mistake, this is not a hobby for Nyari. He’s a terrific illustrator who has found his way and is making his mark in a crowded landscape of creatives.

Via iamdany.com

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There are few joys in life greater than creating something for your child, especially when you’re in the business of creating. San Fransisco-based designer/illustrator Kyson Dana tapped into that very happiness when he and fellow illustrator Jeffery Smith challenged each other to a sketching duel (think Type Fight). After 26 days, Dana knew he would have a special alphabet of animals to share with his young son. The premise was simple, but the execution was quite challenging (and inspiring). In his own words, Dana describes the project: “The rules for the competition were that we had to draw one animal per day and post it to Instagram by midnight. The animal had to start with the letter of the day and the composition could be created using any medium. We made our way through the alphabet beginning with the letter ‘A’ for a full 26 days and never missed a sketch. The pressure of producing a solid sketch grew more and more with each day and we saw our standard for what we posted slowly rise with each new day as well. Finally after 26 days we ended the duel with a bunch of sketches and more than 1,500 new Instagram followers to show for it.” This is just a sampling of Dana’s sketches. Be sure to also check out his outstanding portfolio.

Via kysondana.com and Instagram

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Creativity manifests itself in different ways. We certainly appreciate well-planned, laborious works of art. But we also love seemingly effortless, spontaneous pieces that sort of continuously flow. German-born, New York-based Christoph Niemann is a prolific illustrator/artist, who bills himself as a visual story teller. And that moniker could not be more fitting. You may be familiar with his work, often featured in The New York Times Magazine, Time, The New Yorker, Wired, and others, as well as authoring a number of books. For his weekly Sunday Sketches series, Niemann employs mixed media techniques in some pretty terrific ways, then generously posts them to Instagram for general consumption. His use if everyday objects as part of his sketches is both clever and playful. Niemann seems to see the world through a different lens, creating design-envy worthy work with each piece. We’re definitely going to bookmark this and check back often. Well done.

Via Instagram and christophniemann.com

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Given the abundance of fonts out there (many of which are often free), one would think that the tradition of lettering would be dead. But similar to the rise of vinyl in music these days, the opposite is actually true. Lettering is experiencing a sort of renaissance in the design community. Call it novelty or nostalgia, but there is something very special about lettering, especially in this era of (and we don’t particularly like this term) desktop publishing. Styles run the gamut, and we have an appreciation for the great variety of lettering work currently being done. We are particularly fond of London-based freelance digital letterer and illustrator Linzie Hunter. Her colorful, whimsical style has served an impressive list of clients very well. Those clients include New York Observer, Washington Post, Random House Publishing, Harper Collins, Scholastic, Hallmark, American Girl, Time Magazine, Wall Street Journal, Nike, and many more. Hunter’s work is really quite something… she has a distinct ability to make a heap of information engaging, and even beautiful. And her illustrations are fantastic too. What a talent!

Via linziehunter.co.uk

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