Archives for posts with tag: incredible

We’ve seem many artistic mediums, but never something quite like this. Some of the most recent works by artist Dino Tomic (aka AtomiccircuS) resemble chalk, but its actually… wait for it… ordinary table salt. Based in Norway, by way of Croatia, Tomic painstakingly arranges salt granules in such away that he achieves stunning variations of tone, giving these incredible Game of Thrones portraits an incredibly realistic feel. His beautifully intricate mandalas are also pretty remarkable. There’s simply no denying Tomic’s gift of visualizing his compositions, then slowly building them with his bare hands. And his 270,000+ Instagram followers would surely agree. Try to refrain from yelling at your screen when you reach the 1:07 mark in the video below. Now you can’t say you weren’t warned.

Via Facebook

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Movie buffs rejoice! While we certainly love movies, we are more excited about this incredible series of posters from a design and conceptual perspective. German multidisciplinary design studio Stellavie, in collaboration with illustrator/artist Julian Rentzsch, hit the mark with this superb series of prints paying homage to some of the foremost movie directors in history. Each piece features the director’s portrait as the focal point, with an array of references from some of their impressive body of work. Each composition is quite beautiful with really thoughtful details, and we especially love the traditional movie credit typography incorporated into each layout. Each edition is limited to 200 copies each, and they are signed and numbered, and printed with museum-quality inks on textured, acid-free cotton paper (available for purchase here). Fantastic work on may levels. Bravo.

More killer movie designs here and here and here.

Via stellavie.com and julianrentzsch.de

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Hyper-realistic drawing and painting is an incredible skill that really gives us pause. Especially in the age of high resolution cameras on just about everyone’s phone, and the proliferation of Photoshop-aided art. We sort of take realistic and surrealistic views for granted, but when we look at super-realistic art done by hand, like the work of Australian artist Joel Rea, we ponder the extraordinary artistic dexterity involved. Rea’s breathtaking work clearly draws much inspiration from nature, particularly the ocean. And for anyone who has tried, depicting water realistically is no small feat. Never mind clouds, sand and the human form. Rea’s masterful paintings are not only visually precise, but also do a fantastic job of conveying emotion, whether it be a sense of fear, hope or liberation. These contemporary surrealist works have some real substance, and we look forward to what the future holds for this phenomenal young artist.

Via joelrea.com.au

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In much the same vein as the incredible work of Christopher Boffoli, Japanese artist/designer/art director, miniature photographer Tatsuya Tanaka’s playful take on macro photography is really memorable. Tanaka’s miniature dioramas, if you will, are almost like stepping into the mind of a young child, pushing his broccoli around the plate while his imagination runs wild. Tanaka says, “Everyone must have had similar thoughts at least once. Broccoli and parsley might sometimes look like a forest, or the tree leaves floating on the surface of the water might sometimes look like little boats. Everyday occurrences seen from a pygmy’s perspective can bring us lots of fun thoughts.” A key word here is everyday. Tanaka has actually committed himself to releasing one of these each day, a project aptly titled Miniature Calendar, and has been doing so since April 2011. Yes, everyday, folks. The body of work here is tremendous, and Tanaka’s perspective is fascinating. This is obviously just a very small sample of an incredible project that’s worth following. Just ask his impressive social media following: 35K on Facebook, 242K on Instagram, 88K on Twitter. Tanaka’s mission is simple: “It would be great if you could use it to add a little enjoyment to your everyday life.” We couldn’t agree more.

Via miniature-calendar.com

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Only an immensely talented illustrator could accept a challenge from a friend, and adapt his style so masterfully. This was exactly the case with Russian illustrator/designer/art director Viktor Miller-Gausa. He never really earned his stripes as a cartoonist per se, but when a friend said he could not draw a caricature, Miller-Gausa honed his skills by creating incredible portraits for 31 days of both his friends, and familiar celebrity faces. Here’s a sampling of Miller-Gausa’s awesome work.

Via Cargo Collective

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It was almost a year ago that we posted about an incredible collaboration between Russian photographer Alexander Khokhlov, makeup artist Veronica Ershova, and floral stylist Mikhail Kravchenko. They have teamed up again for a series of striking photos entitled Bloomshapes and Illusions, where they explore photographic portraiture adapted from a variety of influences, such as minimalism and symbolism. They even employ an element of illusion in their work, which makes it that much more special. Particularly notable is their use of flowers, like their remarkable Marge Simpson piece. Here, they employ brilliantly white blooms with great success. The attention to detail and sheer artistry that goes into these photographs is astounding, as exhibited in the video below. We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again… can’t wait to see what they come up with next!

Via alexanderkhokhlov.com and YouTube

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Spring is in the air (sorta), and with summer just around the corner, we thought a beach-related post was in order. A favorite pastime of many is spending warm sunny days building sand castles on the beach. They take many forms, from bucket molds, to deep moat formations, to the ubiquitous drip castle. A Massachusetts artist simply known as SandCastleMatt creates incredible sand structures that stand out from the rest. What’s unique about Matt’s work is that his designs almost look organic, like they naturally emerge from the beach. Using found objects, like sticks, vines, wood and other repurposed junk, Matt builds a framework to support his structures. Then he employs the classic drip method, which conceals the bones of his impressive ephemeral work. a few years back, a viral photo mistakingly identified one of his structures as the result of a lightening strike in the sand, which was later debunked by Scientific American (here).

Via Flickr and Vimeo

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Trash versus treasure is all relative, as everyone pretty much knows by now. Rhode Island-based artist Tom Deininger takes the old adage to heart through his remarkable collage work. From idealistic landscapes (one of which is inspired by Impressionist master Monet), to detailed portraiture, to denim seascapes, to large-scale commissions, Deininger truly transforms found, often discarded, objects into things of beauty and awe. We imagine his workspace to look like The Island of Misfit Toys. It takes true skill, an acute sense of space and color, to compose these stunning pieces. To say that Deininger is an accomplished collage artist is an understatement. Incredible work.

More killer collage work here, here and here.

Via tomdeiningerart.com

 

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We love 3D work that is done thoughtfully and with purpose. And we also have a certain fondness for serial work… that is, work that is part of a series. This terrific set of numbers by Hamburg, Germany-based art director/designer/CGI artist Antoni Tudisco (along with Bucharest-based Andrei Brovcenco) certainly fits the bill. Commissioned by the Financial Times luxury lifestyle magazine, How To Spend It, these numeric characters are expertly constructed in a 3D universe to represent a variety of luxurious goods, including jewelry, gems, precious metals, plush fabrics, floral arrangements, upscale furniture, and even a sailboat. Thanks to incredible advances in 3D technology, and certainly the remarkable talents of Tudisco, the realism achieved here is phenomenal. Nicely done.

Via Behance

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Super-realistic art has a way of making the impossible seem possible. It can be mind-bending and beautiful all at the same time. The work of French artist Daniel Firman embodies those very qualities. His series featuring balancing elephants is particularly intriguing. Firman consulted an actual taxidermist to achieve impactful authenticity. We imagine seeing one of these pieces in person would give one pause… just incredible.

More realistic artwork here and here and here.

Via danielfirman.com

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