Archives for posts with tag: industrial design

French artist/industrial designer known only as Parse/Error recently created an object that is both beautiful and troubling all at the same time. At face value, the Political Lamp is an aesthetically appealing decor piece… a lovely cylindrical dome housing a curious cloud. But behind this facade is a much darker reality, an intentional and well-conceived parallel to the current political climate. The lamp is actually connected to the internet and designed to react to tweets by President Donald Trump (and other political events) by triggering a storm beneath the dome, complete with lightning rolling in the cloud and disturbing the otherwise peaceful glow of the lamp itself. We are utterly intrigued by this piece, and hope for a day when we can look back in relief that the forecasted storm did not do as much damage as predicted. In his own words, the artist explains the project: “The choice of setting the Political Lamp to follow the tweets of Donald Trump is explained by the fact that he perfectly embodies a dangerous era. A world where the words of one man, released without reflection and with spontaneity on a global social network, can endanger the fate of millions by spreading the ghost of nuclear war on the planet…. the idea of the Political Lamp is to hide its true nature behind a beautiful object, which immediately modifies the observer’s behavior when its purpose is revealed, causing anxiety and fascination.”

Via parseerror.ufunk.net

Advertisements

In many industries, some of the most innovative ideas come from young minds. And that is certainly the case here. Simin Qiu, product/industrial design student at the prestigious Royal College of Art in London, conceived the beautiful Swirl faucet. Not only is it aesthetically brilliant, with its elaborately patterned latticework of water streams which are sent through a double turbine inside the fixture, but also conservation conscious, as said turbines limit the flow of water by 15%. Qiu’s work was fittingly awarded a renowned iF Design Concept Award, an international competition recognizing various design disciplines. We really admire how Qiu’s inspiration from nature yielded such an inventive device that could truly make an impact on several levels. Outstanding.

Via Behance

Qiu-1 Qiu-2 Qiu-3 Qiu-4 Qiu-5 Qiu-6 Qiu-7 Qiu-8

We find the manipulation of wood just fascinating. In the right hands, the possibilities are endless. In its natural state as trees, wood can obviously be quite beautiful. But the notion that an artist can create objects that harken back to their natural state, even after having served a function, is really quite something. The extraordinary work of Paris-based French-Argentinean artist and designer Pablo Reinoso speaks to this very idea: “For the series entitled Spaghetti Bench, Pablo Reinoso used public benches, which are anonymously designed and travel across cultures with an out-of-time, old-fashioned quality, as a starting point for his reflections. Started in 2006, these new creations have multiplied and found homes in very diverse places. In line with his work on Thonet’s chairs, the artist explores once again the seat as object. Yet this time it is no longer the object but matter that frees itself from its function and pursues its fate of wood, tree, plant. Reinoso stages benches that, after having accomplished their task as furniture, revert into growing, climbing branches. This freedom is expressed in a movement that embraces architecture, wandering through places, exploring their nooks and crannies, and giving free rein to its whims.” The fluidity of his work, juxtaposed with the perceived functionality of the traditional park bench, makes for some thought-provoking art. Each seems to tell a story. We are particularly taken with the Romeo and Juliette bench that climbs a balcony overhead. Incredible.

Via pabloreinoso.com

Reinoso-01 Reinoso-02 Reinoso-03 Reinoso-04 Reinoso-05 Reinoso-06 Reinoso-07 Reinoso-08 Reinoso-09 Reinoso-10 Reinoso-11 Reinoso-12 Reinoso-13 Reinoso-14 Reinoso-15 Reinoso-16 Reinoso-17 Reinoso-18 Reinoso-19 Reinoso-20 Reinoso-21

We often focus on a single project or series, but the growing body of work by Kyle Wilkeson is just too good not to share. Wilkeson, Yorkshire, England-based letterer/designer/creative director, is innately talented. Quite simply, his work is special. From experimental lettering of Pecha Kucha promotional materials, to the thoughtful typography of his ADC invitation, to his surprisingly elegant and graphic Phaeton Chair, Wilkeson is a young designer to watch.

Via kylewilkinson.co.uk

Wilkeson-01 Wilkeson-02 Wilkeson-03 Wilkeson-04 Wilkeson-05 Wilkeson-06 Wilkeson-07 Wilkeson-08 Wilkeson-09 Wilkeson-10 Wilkeson-11 Wilkeson-12 Wilkeson-13 Wilkeson-14 Wilkeson-15 Wilkeson-16 Wilkeson-17 Wilkeson-18 Wilkeson-19 Wilkeson-20 Wilkeson-21 Wilkeson-22 Wilkeson-23 Wilkeson-24 Wilkeson-25 Wilkeson-26

There’s something to be said for good design (which sorta goes without saying since that is essentially the mantra of this very blog). When designers collaborate (even from different disciplines), special things happen… as is the case with this awesome lamp. The collection, which consists of several different colored lamps that project the celestial constellations of the Northern Hemisphere’s two equinoxes and solstices onto nearby walls and ceilings, was born from the collaboration between Hungarian graphic designer Anna Farkas and Hungarian interior designer Miklós Batisz. What originally began as an art piece by Farkas, the Starry Light collection is now for sale after almost a year of product development, and they are manufactured by hand. What a simple and special idea executed so beautifully.

Via starrylightlamps.com and anagraphic.hu

Starry-1 Starry-2 Starry-3 Starry-4 Starry-5 Starry-6

As a compliment to a previous post, we had to share this excellent video that answers the question, “Why has Herman Miller thrived for 108 years?” Good design at its best, that’s why.

Via YouTube

Though we don’t often comment on industrial design, our love for all things design does not stop at graphics, illustration and photography. Design lovers have coveted the Eames-designed Molded Plastic Chair since its introduction in 1950, and we are no different. Herman Miller has just introduced the Eames Molded Wood Chair, and we are salivating. This timeless design is now available in wood due to today’s techniques of cutting wood into small strips and then process them in a way that makes the wood flexible enough to mold into complex curves. Brilliant and beautiful expression of timeless design.

Via hermanmiller.com and eamesdesigns.com

Eames-01 Eames-02 Eames-03 Eames-04 Eames-05 Eames-06 Eames-07 Eames-08 Eames-09 Eames-10

Okay, yes, this is pretty geeky, but we really love this floppy disk table by Berlin-based design duo Axel van Exel and Marian Neulant of Neuland van Exel. You might expect it to be made out of plastic, but it’s actually built from steel (with the iconic silver shutter doubling as a hidden storage compartment).

Via floppytable.com

Floppy-1 Floppy-2 Floppy-3 Floppy-4 Floppy-5 Floppy-6 Floppy-7

We at Barbour do not fancy ourselves industrial designers, but with a certain fondness for Japanese cuisine, we find this to be an excellent concept. Aptly named “Spoonplus”, it’s a hybrid between chopsticks and a spoon designed by Paris-based designer Aïssa Logerot. Not only can you pinch/pick-up with the chopsticks and scoop with the spoon, but the spoon part also detaches to become a dipping tray. Great, simple design.

Via aissalogerot.com

Some packaging is simply just fun, as is the case with this series of fruit juice packaging. Not sure how banana juice tastes, but Japanese industrial designer Naoto Fukasawa certainly makes it look enticing with his thoughtful design. “Materials are not the mother of design,” says Fukasawa. “Materials and means are the result of thinking how to create a sensuous effect. I imagined that if the surface of the package imitated the colour and texture of the fruit skin, then the object would reproduce the feeling of the real skin.” Fukasawa has even been described by Bloomberg Businessweek as one of the world’s most influential designers.

Via toxel.com

%d bloggers like this: