Archives for posts with tag: ink

On this Election Day, we bring you some of our favorite works inspired by this historic election season. In order: Boston-based artist and collage master Molly Scannell; Brooklyn-based artist and educator David Hollier; Nashville-based artist and sculptor Herb Williams (previous posts here and here); Brazilian artist Butcher Billy (previous post here); Nashville-based (Rochester-born) painter Kristin Llamas. Politics as the subject of art has never been more prevalent. Whether it be the polarizing nature of this particular presidential election, or the reach of social media (probably both, actually), talented artists from all over the country and world have been churning our artwork inspired by this moment in history. Let’s just hope everyone is as energized to vote. Go vote!

Via Instagram, Instagram, Flickr, Behance and kllamas.com

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Tattoos are often very telling. Each and every one seems to have a story behind it, and for those who are covered, it’s like a novel. British photographer Alan Powdrill brings some of these stories to light, with his latest project and exhibition, aptly titled Covered. Looking at Powdrill’s portfolio as a whole, we love his edginess, which seems to be a common thread. Here, Powdrill features subjects who are literally walking canvases, their bodies covered in ink, underneath their everyday garb. This series presents a nice juxtaposition, and gets our minds racing about the evolution of the indelible artwork for each subject, and which unassuming individuals in our own community might be adorned in tattoos in a similar fashion. Powdrill really gets to the heart of photography here… storytelling is fundamental, and his work is quite poetic. Fascinating project, and very well executed.

Via alanpowdrill.com

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Whatever you prefer to call it – hyper-realistic, super-realistic, photo-realistic – what’s real is the remarkable level of skill involved. We’re so taken with this type of art, we’ve featured it several times before (here and here and here and here). This time, it’s the work of Singapore-based artist Ivan Hoo. What makes his work unique is his canvas of choice… a simple board of wood. Hoo’s incredibly realistic pieces interact directly with the wood surface, creating the illusion of three-dimensionality. What’s even more impressive is that Hoo is self-taught. Armed with a few colored pencils, pastels and inks, Hoo transforms everyday objects into drawings with unbelievable results. His Starbucks cup is one of our favorites. Try not to drool too much.

Via Instagram and Tumblr

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Alright a lot have ask for different angle of the Starbucks drawing.

A post shared by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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[Nutella.Spill.] #wip. #pastel on wood.

A post shared by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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Working on a new drawing.✨😊#wip Full video on my Facebook page Ivan Hoo Art.

A post shared by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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[Detail.;] #BoykoKolev inspired piece..More progress on my Tumblr @ivanhooart.

A post shared by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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There are few joys in life greater than creating something for your child, especially when you’re in the business of creating. San Fransisco-based designer/illustrator Kyson Dana tapped into that very happiness when he and fellow illustrator Jeffery Smith challenged each other to a sketching duel (think Type Fight). After 26 days, Dana knew he would have a special alphabet of animals to share with his young son. The premise was simple, but the execution was quite challenging (and inspiring). In his own words, Dana describes the project: “The rules for the competition were that we had to draw one animal per day and post it to Instagram by midnight. The animal had to start with the letter of the day and the composition could be created using any medium. We made our way through the alphabet beginning with the letter ‘A’ for a full 26 days and never missed a sketch. The pressure of producing a solid sketch grew more and more with each day and we saw our standard for what we posted slowly rise with each new day as well. Finally after 26 days we ended the duel with a bunch of sketches and more than 1,500 new Instagram followers to show for it.” This is just a sampling of Dana’s sketches. Be sure to also check out his outstanding portfolio.

Via kysondana.com and Instagram

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We’ve all been there before… a dreaded lecture, and one’s mind starts to wander as pencil meets paper to create some nonsensical drawing. Doodling is a favorite pastime of bored students the world over. But when elevated to this level of artistry, we sit up and take notice. Japanese artist Keita Sagaki’s prolific body of (rather time consuming) work is really impressive. Sagaki juxtaposes recreations of well-known fine art pieces with what would otherwise be considered notebook doodles. From a distance these large-scale works (often several feet in length) bear a striking resemblance to such masterpieces as the Mona Lisa, The Great Wave off Kanagawa, and The Last Supper. But upon closer examination, they are actually densely hand-drawn improvised doodles. Sagaki has even been commissioned to apply his unique method of art making to create famous landmarks from around the world. Just amazing.

Via sagakikeita.com

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It is said that patience is a virtue. And French artists/designers Xavier Casalta and Rémy Boiré are just oozing with it. Casalta’s specialty is pointillism, a technique in which small, distinct dots are applied in patterns to form an image. Boiré is a masterful hand-letterer, whose line work is impeccable. Together they created this phenomenal piece. Clocking in over 300 hours of patience and discipline, Casalta’s and Boiré’s passion for highly detailed design could not be more evident. Not only is this a great example of seamless collaboration, but also of deliberate forethought and planning, as well as hand craftsmanship in an increasingly digital design landscape. Just incredible.

Via casaltaxavier.com and remyboire.fr

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French illustrator/designer Florian Nicolle employs mixed media to create wonderfully complex portraits that are so bold, yet nuanced, that they almost seem to move. With newsprint, watercolor, pencil, ink and Photoshop in his arsenal, Nicolle’s meticulously crafted chaos has been sought after by some pretty high profile clients, including Nike, Puma, Los Angeles Times and ESPN, among others. We love his style, and look forward to keeping an eye on his growing portfolio.

Via Behance

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A few years back Pilot advertised its line of extrafine pens in a particularly clever way. The campaign, by Barcelona advertising agency Grey, featured Lego mini-figures with highly detailed tattoos. Really clever. We love all things Lego (here and here and here)… this campaign definitely gets a thumbs-up from us!

Via designboom

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Rome-based artist Ekaterina Panikanova is an excellent illustrator and painter. But what makes his work really special is his use of books as canvas. Panikanova achieves a collage-like effect by lying these books open and flat while drawing on them. And the results are quite remarkable. We love the composition and overlapping textures.

Via ekaterinapanikanova.com

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UK promotional/gift products company Hundred Million has hit the nail on the head with one particular niche product (catering to design geeks like ourselves, of course): CMYK Playing Cards. It’s actually a wonder that no one has developed these before, but from what we can see, Hundred Million did a bang up job translating traditional playing cards to something every designer could appreciate and love. In their own words, Hundred Million says: “Brilliantly stripping away all the heritage and history of good playing card design, we’ve removed everything we could, the suits have been swapped for the printer’s choice of ink: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black, and the design on the back created from the kind of utilitarian registration marks and checks usually never seen by the public.”

Via hundredmillion.co.uk

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