Archives for posts with tag: insects

Graffiti as we know it is a little less radical these days, much to the disappointment of some. Now sometimes referred to as street art, it has been elevated to just that: art. And with this new cultural regard comes greater exposure. We recently stumbled upon the work of Portuguese artist Sergio Odeith thanks to said exposure, and there is no doubt that his skills are highly artistic, “street” or otherwise. Odeith plays with our minds with his large-scale anamorphic creations he likes to call “sombre 3D”. His sense of space and perspective are astounding, with flawless artistic skills to match. Some of his works are straight up creepy, but that’s probably the point.

More street art posts here and here and here.

Via odeith.com and Instagram

 

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Initially drawn in by typographic papercraft, we quickly realized the portfolio of Lobulo was a treasure trove if dynamic designs. Splitting time between London and Barcelona, Lobulo Design is actually just one man: Javier Rodríguez García. His penchant for working with paper has gained him much respect, and even a viral following online. The well-produced short videos he posts on social media give a nice behind-the-scenes glimpse at Lobule in action, feeding that central hunger for all-access documentation (see some below). The intricacy of Lobulo’s work is striking, and his sense of color and space outstanding. We especially appreciate work that is outside of our comfort zone, and this certainly falls into that category. Just awesome.

Via lobulodesign.com

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We really like the commitment of promising young UK designer Thomas Wightman. Showcased here are two school projects by the recent grad. That’s right, school projects. Wightman aimed high with these tremendously conceptual sculptures, and executed them with perfection. The intricate details are truly astounding. The objective of the assignments (aptly titled The Medium is the Message) was to visually interpret a theme (Wightman chose addiction, with a focus on obsessive driven addictions) through a chosen medium. In his own words, Wightman explains the medium he selected and the meaning behind his first piece: “The book firstly is closed hiding the addiction from view in the same manner as those who hide these addictions from loved ones and friends. However when the book is opened it reveals the chaotic emotions felt. Panic attacks are heavily associated with Obsessive Compulsive disorder and I wanted to convey this through the metaphor of a sinking ship in a vortex drowning from the obsession. Also the symptoms of a panic attack include loss of breath in the same way as drowning in water. However I wanted to add the anchor and typographic rope showing these problems can be solved and the ship can be saved in the same way as those who suffer from OCD when they receive proper treatment.”

For his second book sculpture, Plagued by Doubt, Wightman delved a little deeper into the emotion associated with living with OCD. Wightman explains: “I wanted to convey this idea by making a plague of insects. I decided on moths because I wanted to suggest that the book has been hidden and left, and the moths have eaten away at the pages of the book. This shows that if you don’t seek treatment for OCD, it can become both physically and mentally damaging. Also, typography was used to show the idea that these moths have made a nest within the book – representative of the fact that OCD is usually with a person for life. It lives within and is not noticed until the book is opened, releasing the moths and solving the problem to demonstrate that with proper help, OCD can be treated.” Conceptually and aesthetically beautiful.

More book-related posts here and here and here.

Via Blogspot

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The old adage “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure” is taken to the hilt by Portuguese street artist Artur Bordalo (aka Bordalo II). Bordalo is a master of mixed media, and his work not only repurposes/recycles “garbage”, but also transforms urban landscapes in really intriguing ways. Bordalo sees the world through a different lens, and uses his bare hands to help us see what he sees through figurative painting. Bordalo combs the streets of Lisbon for discarded items, turning them into large scale thought-provoking compositions. In his own words, his artwork “is not only a way to recycle, but also a critique of the world we live in, where we often have nice things, which are based on junk without realizing it.” We particularly love his bird and insect works, as well as his train track transformations, featured below.

More street art posts here and here and here.

Via bordalosegundo.com and Instagram

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With the summer movie season heating up, the popularity of The Avengers and anticipation of some other big names (Spider-Man, Batman), superheroes are more popular than ever. Italian artist Matt Cowan has a unique take on the subject that caught our eye. How cool are these?

Via deviantart.com

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