Archives for posts with tag: inspired

We have long commented on the convergence of history and art. They are intrinsically intertwined, reliant on one another in many ways. So when an artist turns the documentation and storytelling aspect of said junction on its head, we surely take notice. For his series The American Revolution Revolution, Denver-based artist Shawn Huckins masterfully juxtaposes early American portraiture with social media jargon. Thoughtfully conceptualized and brilliantly executed, Huckins’s incredible work succeeds on so many levels. And it’s also important to note that these are physical paintings, should Huckins’s artistic ability ever come into question. Huckins is a superb American artist who is clearly inspired by American Neo-Classical painters, as well as more contemporary Pop artists. In his own words, Huckins explains the series: “The American Revolution was conceived through an exchange of a few well-formed ideas communicated in person and by handwritten letters. Imagine what George & Co. could have done with the Internet. Or not. Technology influences how much we know and what we believe, as well as how quickly and intelligently we convey our ideas. But does how we communicate govern the value of what we communicate? The physical act of typing very fast on small devices has undeniably impacted spelling, grammar, and punctuation, encouraging a degree of illiteracy that has become the new social norm. As goes our grammatical literacy, do our social and cultural literacies follow?”

Via shawnhuckins.com

huckins-01 huckins-02 huckins-03 huckins-04 huckins-05 huckins-06 huckins-07 huckins-08 huckins-09 huckins-10 huckins-11

Advertisements

We’ve seen the work of Malaysian artist/architect “Red” Hong Yi before (here), but we had to revisit her work again because it’s just so good. This time, in keeping with her penchant for food-related art, Hong Yi created a portrait of international action star Jackie Chan’s face from chopsticks… 64,000 chopsticks to be exact. Suspended in bundles of various sizes from a steel frame and when viewed from a distance, the chopsticks bear an unmistakable likeness to the instantly recognizable famous face of Chan. We really admire out-of-the-box thinking like Hong Yi’s here. We have a hard time even gauging the amount of time and planning that went into this… such a creative expression of a brilliantly inspired thinker.

Via redhongyi.com

yi-01 yi-02 yi-03 yi-04 yi-05 yi-06 yi-07 yi-08 yi-09

Trash versus treasure is all relative, as everyone pretty much knows by now. Rhode Island-based artist Tom Deininger takes the old adage to heart through his remarkable collage work. From idealistic landscapes (one of which is inspired by Impressionist master Monet), to detailed portraiture, to denim seascapes, to large-scale commissions, Deininger truly transforms found, often discarded, objects into things of beauty and awe. We imagine his workspace to look like The Island of Misfit Toys. It takes true skill, an acute sense of space and color, to compose these stunning pieces. To say that Deininger is an accomplished collage artist is an understatement. Incredible work.

More killer collage work here, here and here.

Via tomdeiningerart.com

 

Deininger-01 Deininger-02 Deininger-03

Deininger-04 Deininger-05 Deininger-06 Deininger-07 Deininger-08

 

Deininger-09 Deininger-10 Deininger-11 Deininger-12

 

Deininger-13 Deininger-14 Deininger-15 Deininger-16 Deininger-17 Deininger-18 Deininger-19 Deininger-20 Deininger-21 Deininger-22 Deininger-23 Deininger-24

It seems as if we are currently in the golden age of superheroes, at least if the release of major motion pictures is a gauge. These characters seem so pervasive in popular culture today, not just in the US but worldwide, that inspired works of art are almost inevitable. French photographer Sacha Goldberger really raises the bar with his phenomenal series Super Flemish. Goldberger uses not only superheroes, but also science-fiction and a few other characters from popular fantasies, and poses some intriguing questions: What if Superman was born in the sixteenth century? What if the Hulk was a Duke? How might Van Eyck have portrayed Snow White? And he answers them beautifully in this mashup of modern day superheroes, Flemish painting techniques and Elizabethan-era fashion. These works are really quite exquisite, and certainly thought-provoking. Well done, Mr. Goldberger!

This series is slightly reminiscent of work by British artist Steve Payne. More superhero related posts here and here and here.

Via sachabada.com

Goldberger-01 Goldberger-02 Goldberger-03 Goldberger-04 Goldberger-05 Goldberger-06 Goldberger-07 Goldberger-08 Goldberger-09 Goldberger-10 Goldberger-11 Goldberger-12 Goldberger-13 Goldberger-14 Goldberger-15

There’s a lot of buzz surrounding the new Christopher Nolan science-fiction film Interstellar. Given the genre, and anticipation leading up to its release last week, it’s no surprise that a considerable amount of inspired art has surfaced online. Much of it is fan art, but these poster comps by Los Angeles-based designer/art director James Fletcher are more than that. Certainly a fan, but also an entertainment industry insider, Fletcher has loads of experience working in the field. And it shows. We love the variety of his layouts, and the level of detail he brings to the table. There’s nothing static about them… they could be part of the movie itself. These posters are impactful, engaging, and just darn good. Well done. Be sure to check out more of Fletcher’s stellar work.

Via dreamstateconcepts.com and Behance

Fletcher-01 Fletcher-02 Fletcher-03 Fletcher-04 Fletcher-05 Fletcher-06 Fletcher-07 Fletcher-08 Fletcher-09 Fletcher-10

%d bloggers like this: