Archives for posts with tag: interactive

Cubism, widely considered the most influential art movement of the 20th century, was pioneered by Picasso and Braque in the early 1900s. By definition, cubism is a style and movement in which perspective with a single viewpoint was abandoned and use was made of simple geometric shapes, interlocking planes, and even collage. Dutch artist Enno de Kroon takes this one step further, using the unique landscape of the universal egg carton to his advantage in what he calls “eggcubism”. de Kroon had always experimented with distortions of perspective, and he found that the egg carton as his canvas presented a new and unique challenge that forced him to approach painting in a new way. The challenge is not only limited to de Kroon as the creator, but the viewer’s perception is also challenged. de Kroon explains, “The waves of the egg cartons limit the viewer’s perception; they also make him aware of his positioning towards the image. The intentional limitation in subjective perception gives room for imagination and recall: the process of occlusion. By a fusion of direct and indirect perception conventional imagery is overtaken. At first sight this leads to a physical and mental incompleteness, that forces an integration which can only take place within the inner experience, apart from time and space. One could say that the complete image just emerges sublimated in the viewers mind. Gestalt psychology states that human perception aims for completeness. Perceptions are being added subconsciously. My eggcubist works evoke conscious and dynamic adding. The objects not only refer to themselves, they also refer to each other as a series.” In a digital age of augmented reality and immersive 3D experiences, de Kroon’s eggcubism pays homage to traditional cubism, with an interactive twist.

Via ennodekroon.nl and Flickr

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You may already be familiar with the work of contemporary American artist Scott Blake. Blake’s work is not only visually compelling, but also engaging and usually interactive. Some of his most prominent works involve bar codes (aptly called Barcode Art), which fittingly mock consumerism and the increasing societal dominance of big data. Blake has a clear love of technology, and uses it in incredible, sometimes controversial, ways. His “Chuck Close Filter” which emulated a technique made famous by the celebrated artist, for instance, was shut down by Close himself, citing jeopardy to his livelihood and trivializing his work. We are not even scratching the surface of Blake’s growing body of work, nor are we doing it much justice. Be sure to visit Blake’s site and take it all in first-hand.

Via barcodeart.com and YouTube

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Cape Town artist, and self-described miniaturist, Lorraine Loots is big on talent. Back in January 2013 Loots began painting a miniature piece each day, aptly naming the project 365 Paintings for Ants. And when we say miniature, we mean minuscule… some are barely as large as one’s thumbnail. Her love for detail, however, is not at all diminutive and does not suffer in the least by the very small scale of her works. With little more than pencils, extremely fine paint brushes and a magnifying glass, Loots creates a unique work of art each day. For the first iteration of the project in 2013 her subjects were decidedly random. From something that pertained to her day, to a special event for a particular date, to even suggestions by others. Loots explains: “I see it as a kind of an interactive project. I’m definitely not the tortured artist sitting in a corner expressing my emotions. I’m influenced by everything around me.” For 2014, Loots decided to focus on Cape Town, in honor of its distinction of being named World Design Capital by the International Council of Societies of Industrial Design (ICSID) for its dedication to using design for social, cultural and economic development. Loots sells each original framed painting, as well as a very limited run of archival prints. Not only are her artistic skills prodigious, her entrepreneurial spirit is also impressive. Be sure to also check out the beautifully produced video below. We look forward to the project’s evolution for the coming year!

Via lorraineloots.com

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