Archives for posts with tag: interior design

The artist who brought us the Political Lamp (here) has another intriguing and unsettling creation: the Earthquake Lamp. Much like his work on the Political Lamp, French artist known only as ParseError explores art, design, technology, and science through this fascinating object. Linked to data from IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology), the Earthquake Lamp responds in real time to earthquakes from around the world with pulsing lights and an unsettling sort of rumble. As an object, it’s really quite beautiful. But the meaningful, connected aspect elevates it well beyond just a decorative piece. The technology is so nuanced, its light and sound output changes according to the location and magnitude of the earthquake, varying the color and duration of the pulsations, and the power of the sound. Ironically, (what appears to be) its glass tube design looks quite fragile, so in the event of a local earthquake, one may be left with a pile of glass. Either way, ParseError has done it again… walking that line between anxiety and fascination. And evoking emotion is what art is all about.

Via parseerror.ufunk.net

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French artist/industrial designer known only as Parse/Error recently created an object that is both beautiful and troubling all at the same time. At face value, the Political Lamp is an aesthetically appealing decor piece… a lovely cylindrical dome housing a curious cloud. But behind this facade is a much darker reality, an intentional and well-conceived parallel to the current political climate. The lamp is actually connected to the internet and designed to react to tweets by President Donald Trump (and other political events) by triggering a storm beneath the dome, complete with lightning rolling in the cloud and disturbing the otherwise peaceful glow of the lamp itself. We are utterly intrigued by this piece, and hope for a day when we can look back in relief that the forecasted storm did not do as much damage as predicted. In his own words, the artist explains the project: “The choice of setting the Political Lamp to follow the tweets of Donald Trump is explained by the fact that he perfectly embodies a dangerous era. A world where the words of one man, released without reflection and with spontaneity on a global social network, can endanger the fate of millions by spreading the ghost of nuclear war on the planet…. the idea of the Political Lamp is to hide its true nature behind a beautiful object, which immediately modifies the observer’s behavior when its purpose is revealed, causing anxiety and fascination.”

Via parseerror.ufunk.net

Well, that’s actually not exactly accurate. We completed (most of) the renovation of our Rochester studio in the late spring/early summer, but our new chairs finally just arrived a little while ago. So, thought it fitting to unveil in the new year. While it’s not a huge space, we tried to maximize what room we do have, while creating a more open environment. Here’s to our redesigned studio fostering creativity in 2015 and beyond!

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Having just dabbled in a bit of interior design ourselves with the renovation of one of our studios, we’ve become particularly aware of some exceptional furnishings lately. And this is one super example. Designed and developed by Spanish duo Ramón Úbeda and Otto Canalda, Up In The Air table is a thoughtfully conceived piece of art that also happens to double as a side table. Each cylindrical piece is constructed out of a patented environment-friendly resin with handmade fish replicas. In the designers’ own words: “Fish that aren’t fish. That seem to float in water that isn’t water. They seem to be suspended in air that isn’t air. Like a dream.”

Via viccarbe.com

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Dutch artist Guda Koster creates living sculptures with actual people, which result in these terrific photographs. Influences of fashion, interior design and even theater are evident in her work. In her own words, Koster’s work serves as social commentary: “I make installations, sculptures and photographs in which clothing plays an important part. Clothing doesn’t just have a function but also conveys a message. In our everyday lives we communicate identity and social position primarily by means of our clothing. Clothing can be seen as a visual art form that expresses the way we see ourselves and our relationship with the world around us.” The titles of these works include Red With White Dots, Cloud, Stairway to Heaven, Fear of Grey Mice, Girl, and Happy Birthday.

Via gudakoster.nl

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The exceptional work by Hungarian designer Miklós Kiss is proof that good typography transcends culture. This typographical eye candy by Kiss is all part of the identity and interior design of Budapest club/bar/restaurant Trafiq. These flawless typographical treatments could easily stand on their own, but imagine being inundated by such beautifully executed and playful exercises in typography as part of an interior design? We are in awe. A Barbour business lunch in Budapest may be in order!

Via Behance

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