Archives for posts with tag: intricate details

In honor of National Coffee Day, we thought it fitting to showcase an artist who (subtly) uses the magical brown elixir to make art. Maui-based mixed-media artist Alessandra Maria creates beautifully detailed, dark and delicate portraits using little more than a pencil, black ink and gold leaf on coffee-stained paper. Inspired by Austrian symbolist painter Gustav Klimt, Maria’s haunting life-like portraits evoke fantasy and mystery with intricate details set on an eerily enigmatic surface achieved through the coffee’s dark brown grounds. There are even religious overtones in these thought-provoking masterpieces. Maria’s work is simply beautiful and poignant.

Via alessandramaria.com

Movie buffs rejoice! While we certainly love movies, we are more excited about this incredible series of posters from a design and conceptual perspective. German multidisciplinary design studio Stellavie, in collaboration with illustrator/artist Julian Rentzsch, hit the mark with this superb series of prints paying homage to some of the foremost movie directors in history. Each piece features the director’s portrait as the focal point, with an array of references from some of their impressive body of work. Each composition is quite beautiful with really thoughtful details, and we especially love the traditional movie credit typography incorporated into each layout. Each edition is limited to 200 copies each, and they are signed and numbered, and printed with museum-quality inks on textured, acid-free cotton paper (available for purchase here). Fantastic work on may levels. Bravo.

More killer movie designs here and here and here.

Via stellavie.com and julianrentzsch.de

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Exercises in typographic and mosaic compositions bring us back to our early studies as designers. Not because they are novice or effortless, but because they touch on the fundamentals of good design. Italian artist/designer known as Antonio Village9991 is quite adept at both, as exhibited by this sampling of his impressive body of work. For almost twenty years, Antonio has been creating these digital compositions that are much more difficult than they may look. It takes an acute sense of space and a savvy discernment of color to engineer these beautifully intricate pieces. Antonio’s work lends itself to multiple viewing distances… truly incredible details up close, with the larger image emerging the further away you move. Some may rely on complex algorithms to accomplish this, but what makes Antonio’s work so special is that it comes from his creative thought processes and keen attention to detail. One word: wow!

More mosaics here and here and here.

Via village9991.it and Behance

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Wood probably would not be a sculptor’s first choice to replicate ripples in clothing, flowing strands of hair, or someone emerging from water in a bikini after a swim. But Italian artist Peter Demetz sees no limits in his material of choice, which is what makes his work so remarkable. The incredibly lifelike details are truly awe-inspiring. Demetz’s familiarity with human anatomy, and his ability to transform a material that seems so rigid and inanimate is like nothing we’re ever seen. Also notable is Demetz’s sense of composition. Most of the figures’ backs are facing the viewer, often in some pensive moment that feels a bit sad and poignant through the authentic body language Demetz achieves with an almost photographic quality. Needless to say, Demetz is an immensely talented sculptor.

Be sure to check out the video below too… though it’s not in English, it gives a good sense of scale and process. Truly stunning.

Via peterdemetz.it

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We really like the commitment of promising young UK designer Thomas Wightman. Showcased here are two school projects by the recent grad. That’s right, school projects. Wightman aimed high with these tremendously conceptual sculptures, and executed them with perfection. The intricate details are truly astounding. The objective of the assignments (aptly titled The Medium is the Message) was to visually interpret a theme (Wightman chose addiction, with a focus on obsessive driven addictions) through a chosen medium. In his own words, Wightman explains the medium he selected and the meaning behind his first piece: “The book firstly is closed hiding the addiction from view in the same manner as those who hide these addictions from loved ones and friends. However when the book is opened it reveals the chaotic emotions felt. Panic attacks are heavily associated with Obsessive Compulsive disorder and I wanted to convey this through the metaphor of a sinking ship in a vortex drowning from the obsession. Also the symptoms of a panic attack include loss of breath in the same way as drowning in water. However I wanted to add the anchor and typographic rope showing these problems can be solved and the ship can be saved in the same way as those who suffer from OCD when they receive proper treatment.”

For his second book sculpture, Plagued by Doubt, Wightman delved a little deeper into the emotion associated with living with OCD. Wightman explains: “I wanted to convey this idea by making a plague of insects. I decided on moths because I wanted to suggest that the book has been hidden and left, and the moths have eaten away at the pages of the book. This shows that if you don’t seek treatment for OCD, it can become both physically and mentally damaging. Also, typography was used to show the idea that these moths have made a nest within the book – representative of the fact that OCD is usually with a person for life. It lives within and is not noticed until the book is opened, releasing the moths and solving the problem to demonstrate that with proper help, OCD can be treated.” Conceptually and aesthetically beautiful.

More book-related posts here and here and here.

Via Blogspot

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