Archives for posts with tag: intricate

Some of the most moving pieces of art involve the human form. After all, everyone on the planet can relate in some capacity… we are all human. Nature is also an ever-present theme, and artists sometimes explore the relationship between the two. Which is exactly the case for the work of Virginia-based sculptor Christopher David White. But what is really intriguing about White’s incredible body of work is his ability to manipulate perception… in essence, his mastery of illusion (or in art-speak, trompe l’oeil, visual illusion in art, which literally translates to “deceives the eye” from French). Upon inspection, White’s work appears to be intricately sculpted from petrified wood. We might add, if these pieces were sculpted from wood, that would be impressive in and of itself. But these stunning sculptures are actually rendered from clay with an astounding attention to detail. At its core, White’s work is about change. In his own words: “Change is a constant reminder that permanence is the ultimate illusion. It is through the creation of hyper-realistic sculpture that I explore the relationship between nature, man, and the phenomenon of impermanence.”

Via christopherdavidwhite.com

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In honor of National Coffee Day, we thought it fitting to showcase an artist who (subtly) uses the magical brown elixir to make art. Maui-based mixed-media artist Alessandra Maria creates beautifully detailed, dark and delicate portraits using little more than a pencil, black ink and gold leaf on coffee-stained paper. Inspired by Austrian symbolist painter Gustav Klimt, Maria’s haunting life-like portraits evoke fantasy and mystery with intricate details set on an eerily enigmatic surface achieved through the coffee’s dark brown grounds. There are even religious overtones in these thought-provoking masterpieces. Maria’s work is simply beautiful and poignant.

Via alessandramaria.com

We’ve seen art created from a wide variety of media, but nothing quite like this. As a matter of fact, if you had to guess how these were created just by looking at them, you’d probably have a hard time figuring it out. Relying on little more than brown packing tape, an Xacto and the filtering of light behind a translucent surface, Amsterdam-based artist Max Zorn’s work is awe-inspiring. The nuance in shading he achieves by layering tape is astounding all on its own. Never mind Zorn’s ability to manipulate the tape so intricately. It’s interesting how these works, composed of such an unexpected and artless material, are so beautiful. Zorn clearly has a penchant for the past, as indicated by his choice of subjects for the majority of his work. Interestingly, Zorn’s fondness for packing tape began as street art, as he describes in his own words: “There’s a lot of great street art by day, but it disappears after dark. I wanted to come up with urban art that uses nighttime as a setting, and there was nothing more inviting than the street lamps in Amsterdam. In the beginning I used packing tape to fill in larger sections of my marker drawings. Once I hung them on street lamps, the light’s effect opened up new ideas with ditching markers and just using tape.”

Via maxzorn.com and YouTube

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With financial matters on the minds of many around the world on the heals of our historic presidential election just one week ago, we thought it fitting to share this project by Georgian illustrator/designer Tatiana Trikoz. Commissioned by Swiss banking group Swissquote, Trikoz created these incredibly intricate currency portraits featuring some of the world’s most famous billionaires – Mark Zuckerberg, Richard Branson and Elon Musk. Trikoz seamlessly adheres to the look of the existing currency she aims to mimic… we are in awe of the stunning details. Perhaps our president-elect will commission her to imagine his likeness on U.S. currency in the near future? Crazier things have happened….

Via Behance

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Michigan artist and educator Anne Mondro has a fascination with human anatomy, so pairing that interest with her superb crocheting skills was a natural union. Using thin copper and steel wire, Mondro creates beautifully intricate crocheted sculptures of hearts, lungs, limbs, and even entire bodies. In her own words, Mondro states, “My creative work explores the physical and emotional complexity of the human body. Intrigued by the ways the human body is experienced and valued in society, I create sculptures and images that investigate and portray various aspects of humanity. Crocheting (the process of using a hooked needle to pull loops from a continuous thread and working with one stitch at a time) enables the figures to interlace each other physically and metaphorically to express these aspects of humanity. The color and texture of the wire adds to the work by portraying the figures as ethereal silhouettes, evoking associations with mortality and spirituality.” This is not your grandmother’s needlework, that’s for certain.

Via annemondro.com and ceresgallery.org

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Some “tree huggers” may view paper art (here and here and here) as a gratuitous use of precious paper. But Spanish paper artist Malena Valcárcel may just have found a way to please art lovers and environmentalists alike. Valcárcel “upcycles” discarded or recycled books into quite beautiful sculptures. She is astoundingly self-taught, and her work is intricate and delicate in a way that serves the fine print of her chosen medium (printed matter) really well. She even utilizes lighting in some of her pieces, which adds an entirely new magical dimension. In her own words, “My main inspirations come from nature and everyday life, and I often return to certain ideas again and again. Flowers, trees, butterflies, houses, clouds … without forgetting the sea, really fascinate me. Turning books into sculptures, cutting and shaping paper into different shapes or abstract forms never ceases to amaze me, and when the work is finished, just contemplating it brings a smile to my face. Making things has always been incredibly important to me and it is often an amazing release to get it out of my system. It’s a joy to hunt for things for my work…the lost, found and forgotten all have places in what I make. Most of my pieces use recycled materials, not only as an ethical statement, but I believe they add more authenticity and charm.” Charming, indeed.

Via Behance and Etsy

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Chalking has been growing in popularity for years, in part due to the increased visibility of incredible artists like Dana Tanamachi (here) and others (here and here). There seems to be a mini movement in Japan right now involving blackboards and chalk (more here). As the saying goes, “everything old is new again”, blackboards, which are now being replaced with whiteboards, possess a sort of novelty these days. Hirotaka Hamasaki, aka Hamacream, is a Japanese art teacher with incredible skills and thousands of Instagram followers. His ability to recreate intricate familiar works of art (on a chalkboard, no less) is just stunning. Though the impermanence of this medium is a bit unnerving to us (we’d want to preserve these works for a long time), they are no less brilliantly executed for having been created with chalk. Truly inspiring.

Via Instagram and Twitter

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Denver-based artist Jaime Molina has a very specific aesthetic. Clearly influenced by folk art, Molina’s work seems to be part of a larger narrative, complete with characters and such. We love it all, but are really taken with his 3D sculpture work, which has a whimsical, yet rustic feel. We particularly love how Molina uses nails to form the hair of his bearded characters. Though the nails are of varying sizes and seem to be placed almost haphazardly, there’s also a uniformity that’s really intriguing. Some of these intricate pieces even open to reveal a sort of center “skull”. Awesome work, so imaginative.

Via cuttyup.com and Instagram

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Upon quick initial inspection, it’s hard to tell what medium New York artist/photographer Sam Kaplan is working with. If you guessed sticks of chewing gum, you’d be right. Yes, these colorful, intricate, quite beautiful structures in the series he aptly calls Unwrapped are made of gum. We are big fans of art made from everyday objects (here and here and here), and Kaplan’s work fits nicely into that niche, but with a certain level of sophistication that really transforms the objects. We credit this to Kaplan’s superb implementation, not only by way of his thoughtful architectural prowess, but his masterful compositions and impeccable photography skills, which elevate each piece well beyond ordinary. This series would not be what it is in the hands of a less capable artist… we applaud Kaplan for his creative thinking and brilliant execution.

Via samkaplan.com and Instagram

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Organizing the Emerald City… #gumunwrapped

A post shared by Sam Kaplan (@samkaplanphoto) on

Initially drawn in by typographic papercraft, we quickly realized the portfolio of Lobulo was a treasure trove if dynamic designs. Splitting time between London and Barcelona, Lobulo Design is actually just one man: Javier Rodríguez García. His penchant for working with paper has gained him much respect, and even a viral following online. The well-produced short videos he posts on social media give a nice behind-the-scenes glimpse at Lobule in action, feeding that central hunger for all-access documentation (see some below). The intricacy of Lobulo’s work is striking, and his sense of color and space outstanding. We especially appreciate work that is outside of our comfort zone, and this certainly falls into that category. Just awesome.

Via lobulodesign.com

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