Archives for posts with tag: ironic

Australian photographer James Popsys has some serious skills behind both the lens and his MacBook Pro, but his work is anything but serious. Popsys is not one to indulge in self-importance or highbrow projects but rather focuses on manipulating scenes from everyday life into playful, sometimes ironic works. That’s not to say his approach is not conceptual or smart… Popsys just can’t help but inject his subversive sense of humor into his surreal photographs. In these globally solemn and often humorless times, Popsys’s work is refreshing. Keep it coming.

Via jamespopsys.com

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Israeli photographer Rubi Lebovitch has a sort of subversive sense of humor, and for the record, we love it. Though his photographs themselves are pretty straightforward, Lebovitch has the uncanny ability to find the absurd in the ordinary. There’s a great cerebral quality to his work, in which the viewer is not guided by a predetermined story arc, but instead can deduce any number of things from his unexpected and beautifully absurd work. For his series Home Sweet Home, Lebovitch utilizes an intimate domestic setting for a veritable fun house. There is a certain charm in Lebovitch’s hyperbole, and ironically enough, you too can display it in your own home in a tidy coffee table book (available here). In his own words, Lebovitch discusses his book: “My photographs deal with domestic scenes captured in straightforward images…characterized by mystery, vagueness and absurdity. I create a twist in familiar sights and build new contexts, thus endowing the scene with new meanings. Mundane objects and domestic spaces are transformed into something strange and surprising. My images do not contain a clear-cut story or plot. The characters are inscrutable to the viewers and difficult to identify; their relationship with the world around them is senseless and they fail to communicate. Rationality is substituted by a twisted and exaggerated worldview. I employ a multiplicity of objects, allowing the objects to grow stronger and take over reality; they occupy and control the space. The scenes depicted in the photographs emphasize what usually remains hidden: the repressed, which cannot be described. The anxiety these scenes arouse undermines the peacefulness and security usually associated with home.”

Via rubilebovitch.com and loeildelaphotographie.com

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Design really is all about communication and education, whether its purpose is to sell, explain, or simply draw attention. In the case of this brilliantly clever self-initiated poster, the visuals do all the work to raise awareness of an often ignored issue facing sharks in their, well, house (more about that here). A collaborative effort between Italian-born, San Francisco-based 3D master Matteo Musci, and London creative studio, Featherwax, which specializes in retouching and CGI, this striking poster does a terrific job of immediately drawing the viewer in with its arresting visuals. Inspired by an iconic movie poster, this piece’s strength is in its irony. In their own words, the duo explains: “An in-house concept to promote awareness for shark-culling, and the number of sharks killed annually. Due to the demonization of sharks, it’s often an overlooked issue. The concept here is to compare the number of deaths each species cause each other, and visually turn that fear on its head. The Jaws poster naturally springs to mind, and can be viewed as a boat full of harpoon-guns.”

Jaws related posts here and here and here

Via Behance

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Original JAWS poster:

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While fashion and still life photography can be very straightforward, we’re always pleased when we see it take a conceptual turn. London-based Lithuanian photographer Aleksandra Kingo is particularly adept at elevating her work to art. Her personality shines through, and makes for some very compelling work. In her own words, her work is “feminine, a bit awkward and full of irony. She believes that photography should be personal and loves the possibility of creating any kind of world through her medium. Most of her work is based around people and their identities and she gains a lot inspiration from everyday life stories as well as popular culture.”

Via aleksandrakingo.com

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This funny series by London based designer/illustrator/author Aled Lewis has been floating around the web for sometime… and every time I revisit it, it never disappoints. Lewis arranges toy figures and pairs them with ironic dialog, with fantastically funny results. They are now available to purchase as prints, and soon compiled in a book to be released later this year.

Via aledlewis.com

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