Archives for posts with tag: Italian

Though we would not necessarily describe ourselves, or our design philosophy as quirky, we can certainly appreciate an idiosyncratic design approach. Italian-based multidisciplinary design practice Mathery Studio seem to live and die by such an unconventional way of thinking, and it shows in their exceptional, and sometimes eccentric, work. Case in point is a recent project for Australian brand Odd Pears, which is in the business of selling creative and colorful mismatched socks. This campaign, Pull Them Up, is described as “a Monday to Friday guide to different ways to pull up your socks.” Mathery’s unique and humorous mode of expression is a perfect match (pun intended) for Odd Pears. In their own words, “In this campaign we focused on the act of ‘pulling up the socks’ and for five lucky Odd Pears trios we have designed a system which will allow every early morning-still-sleepy bird to get dressed in just one move.”

Via mathery.it

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Design really is all about communication and education, whether its purpose is to sell, explain, or simply draw attention. In the case of this brilliantly clever self-initiated poster, the visuals do all the work to raise awareness of an often ignored issue facing sharks in their, well, house (more about that here). A collaborative effort between Italian-born, San Francisco-based 3D master Matteo Musci, and London creative studio, Featherwax, which specializes in retouching and CGI, this striking poster does a terrific job of immediately drawing the viewer in with its arresting visuals. Inspired by an iconic movie poster, this piece’s strength is in its irony. In their own words, the duo explains: “An in-house concept to promote awareness for shark-culling, and the number of sharks killed annually. Due to the demonization of sharks, it’s often an overlooked issue. The concept here is to compare the number of deaths each species cause each other, and visually turn that fear on its head. The Jaws poster naturally springs to mind, and can be viewed as a boat full of harpoon-guns.”

Jaws related posts here and here and here

Via Behance

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Original JAWS poster:

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Exercises in typographic and mosaic compositions bring us back to our early studies as designers. Not because they are novice or effortless, but because they touch on the fundamentals of good design. Italian artist/designer known as Antonio Village9991 is quite adept at both, as exhibited by this sampling of his impressive body of work. For almost twenty years, Antonio has been creating these digital compositions that are much more difficult than they may look. It takes an acute sense of space and a savvy discernment of color to engineer these beautifully intricate pieces. Antonio’s work lends itself to multiple viewing distances… truly incredible details up close, with the larger image emerging the further away you move. Some may rely on complex algorithms to accomplish this, but what makes Antonio’s work so special is that it comes from his creative thought processes and keen attention to detail. One word: wow!

More mosaics here and here and here.

Via village9991.it and Behance

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Call us tortured designers, but being exposed to really bad menu design in an otherwise decent establishment can be slightly agonizing. A business lunch with the Barbour crew inevitably ends up being a design critique of the menu (good or bad) upon the first few minutes of being seated. Yes, it’d probably make for a good SNL skit, but in all seriousness, menu design is an important detail that is sometimes missed. That is certainly not the case for this Italian restaurant, Ristorante Firenze, located near, of all places, Frankfurt, Germany. Stuttgart-based designer Sarah Le Donne is tremendously talented, and really shows her design chops with this branding package. We particularly love the typography and adept use of color. Le Donne explains: “After a small refresh of the existing logo, the task was to create a totally new concept and design for menu and wine cards, vouchers, brochures, business cards, letterheads and a website. The idea behind the identity was to lay the focus on the fresh products the restaurant is well known for. Also the classical Italian colors are reinterpreted in a modern way.” Really well done.

More restaurant-related design here and here and here.

Via sarahledonne.com

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With all this fingerprint/Touch ID talk lately, we thought it fitting to take a closer look at some amusing artwork by an Italian artist who goes by the name “Dito Von Tease” (“dito” translates to “finger” in Italian, and is a reference to Dita Von Teese, the famous icon of “burlesque” style and expert in disguises). What started as a simple avatar for his Facebook page has evolved into this amusing and fascinating project that has really caught on (it was featured on the Today Show and there’s even an iPhone app). The philosophy behind the project may seem sort of highbrow, but the whole thing looks like just plain fun. “Dito” explains: “The Ditology-project wants to invite everybody to look beyond the “masks” we use in playing our lives and to go deep to find our unique “fingerprint”. In the “digital age” (digitus is Latin for finger) the finger is the “tool” we use in our touch-screens, mouse pads and keyboard. Thus everybody is “hidden behind his finger” while surfing the internet and especially in social networks.”

Via Blogspot

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