Archives for posts with tag: King Kong

Believe it or not, for being such a simple, uncomplicated product, Lego has some particularly clever and thought-provoking advertisements (here and here). Already three years old, this campaign celebrating 55 years of the Lego brand is basically a series of 55 visual riddles, fittingly featuring little more than the iconic bricks. The great minds at Swiss agency Cavalcade are behind these fantastically clever designs, which, much like Legos themselves, inspire a great deal of imagination. We must admit, we’re still struggling to solve many of these, but it’s so satisfying having solved the ones we did. Answer key to the few ads featured here at the bottom of this post. No peeking, try to figure them out for yourself!

Via Behance

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Answers (in order of images): Yellow Submarine, Alice in Wonderland, Three Little Pigs, Purple Rain, Jaws, Spider-Man, The White Stripes, Hunger Games, Four Weddings and a Funeral, Bob Marley and the Wailers, Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Jackson 5, King Kong, Titanic, Stairway to Heaven, I Walk the Line, The Beatles, New Kids on the Block, Little Red Riding Hood, Clockwork Orange, Men in Black, Rolling Stones

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It’s not unusual for art and commerce to collide. But it’s certainly not always as awe-inspiring as this arresting piece from Vienna, Austria-based package designer and artist Gerlinde Gruber. Priding herself in creating “specialized packaging designs highly inspired by their contents”, Gruber is more intimately familiar with the intricacies of product packages than the average person. So it’s fitting that one of the world’s largest manufacturers of folding cartons, Mayr-Melnhof Packaging, commissioned Gruber to create a larger than life mural. Composed of more than 1,700 packages, this pseudo aerial view of a colorful cityscape is an exercise in color and form. Gruber also draws surprising parallels between packages and movies: “This model of an modern large city reminds us of the highly detailed city mock-ups which were made for such science fiction monster-movies, to be destroyed dramatically afterwards. Movies and packagings have many parallels. They pack contents to discover it to the maximum effect. Both are subject to trends, but always striking new paths to set trends by themselves. Brands and their products are showcased like movies and provoke customers emotions and reactions. The packaging is actor and stage at the same time. These cardboard boxes tell stories about the packaged product, such as houses talk about their residents.”

Via Behance

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The sheer mastery demonstrated in the retro-futurisitic style of Belgium illustrator/designer Laurent Durieux is hard to ignore. It’s not just the novelty of bucking recent design trends and appearing to be from another era (think 1960s pop culture) that makes Durieux’s work so special, but also the level of detail in his work. Durieux’s eye for composition, typography and color only enhance his brilliant work, which (no surprise) has been commissioned by none other than Mondo (see related posts here and here and here).

Via laurentdurieux.com

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