Archives for posts with tag: landscapes

We’ve looked at double exposure photography many times before (here and here and here), but we’ve never seen analog work quite like this arresting series, Jarred & Displaced, by Finnish photographer Christoffer Relander. We often marvel at artists who choose more traditional or “old school” methods of art making, which is the case with Relander’s striking photos here. Rather than capturing his photos digitally, then quickly bringing them into Photoshop for manipulation, Relander takes to the dark room to work his magic. While each composite is brilliant by its own merits, Relander’s process somehow makes his work that much more precious. As if pouring his heart into these very personal photographs was not enough, Relander also collaborated with fellow Finnish photographer and filmmaker Anders Lönnfeldt on a simply exquisite short film about this project, which is a true work of art in and of itself. In his own words, Relander discusses this mysteriously beautiful ongoing project: “For over a year now I’ve been collecting landscapes in jars using analog double exposures—in this project I have realized a childish dream. I play with the idea of being an ambitious collector; conserving my environments into a large personal collection. Most landscapes are from where I grew up, in the countryside in the south of Finland, where my roots still lie. Separation anxiety to my childhood is simply what absorbed me into this project.”

Via christofferrelander.com

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Trash versus treasure is all relative, as everyone pretty much knows by now. Rhode Island-based artist Tom Deininger takes the old adage to heart through his remarkable collage work. From idealistic landscapes (one of which is inspired by Impressionist master Monet), to detailed portraiture, to denim seascapes, to large-scale commissions, Deininger truly transforms found, often discarded, objects into things of beauty and awe. We imagine his workspace to look like The Island of Misfit Toys. It takes true skill, an acute sense of space and color, to compose these stunning pieces. To say that Deininger is an accomplished collage artist is an understatement. Incredible work.

More killer collage work here, here and here.

Via tomdeiningerart.com

 

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Tilt–shift photography/videography is a technique often used to simulate a miniature scene. The selective focus style manipulates real-life scenes to look like small-scale models. Amsterdam-based photographer/designer/videographer Martijn Doolaard recently unveiled a mini-masterpiece utilizing this very technique. Entitled The Little Nordics, this short time-lapse video is a sort of love letter to the stunning landscapes of Norway and Iceland. In his own words, Doolaard gives a little back story: “Most parts are recorded in summer 2013. Prior to my trip to Norway I did not really have a plan for a movie. I visited Norway twice before and this time I wanted to go to some places I didn’t see before like Geiranger, Atlanterhavsveien and Trollstigen. Along the way I shot some timelapse videos of the fjords. Once I arrived in Geiranger I really enjoyed watching the hustle and bustle down the fjord. Ferries sailing back and forth through the fjords, kayak cruises arriving and departing and cars crawling up and down the steep roads. I liked the idea of portraying Norway as a cute little world while it’s known for it’s large scale nature and remote landscapes.” Doolaard is truly gifted, nailing every detail, from ambient sound effects, to the music and tempo. We could watch this over and over. Well done.

Via Vimeo and Facebook

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Though relatively new on the scene of traditional film photography, German photographer Florian Imgrund creates masterful compositions the old school way. Imgrund got his first film camera just four years ago, and has been building an impressive body of work ever since. Employing double exposure techniques in the darkroom, Imgrund often merges beautiful landscapes with human forms… all without any computer manipulation. The results are incredible. Reminiscent of some other double exposure work here.

Via inthoughts.de

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Award-winning, Sydney, Australia-based photographer Sébastien Millier has a fantastic story telling ability through both photography and written words. His thoughtful and expressive work really captures his subjects in a special way. We especially like his “Stories” series, specifically his Golden Soil project. There is something to be said for Millier’s writing, which is just as compelling as his photography (we love the appropriately golden cast of these photos). Millier brings to life something that could otherwise have come across as mundane. Golden Soil tells the story of an Australian mining site. An excerpt: “Broken Hill is a small town in outback New South Wales, Australia, a pocket of civilization in the middle of wide brown land. Flat, dry and rich in minerals, the surrounding area is a miner’s paradise, a kind of geological Las Vegas of unearthly proportions….”

Via sebastienmillier.com

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Canadian artist Guy Laramee’s work carving books (yes, books!) into landscapes is absolutely remarkable. He transforms books of all sizes into stunning topographical scenes with amazing care and attention to detail. In his own words, “I carve landscapes out of books and I paint romantic landscapes. Mountains of disused knowledge return to what they really are: mountains. They erode a bit more and they become hills. Then they flatten and become fields where apparently nothing is happening. Piles of obsolete encyclopedias return to that which does not need to say anything, that which simply IS.”

Via guylaramee.com

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