Archives for posts with tag: Legos

LEGO bricks are no longer just plastic construction toys, they have permeated all facets of pop culture lately… showing up on the silver screen, in video games, on clothing and even fine art. Classically trained Italian artist Stefano Bolcato has had such a penchant for the timeless toys since childhood that he began using them, and specifically the yellow minifigures, as subject matter for years. Recently, Bolcato took this a step further by reimagining classic paintings with LEGO figures in his series titled People. From Andy Warhol’s legendary Marilyn Diptych to Frida Kahlo’s Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird and Leonardo da Vinci’s Portrait of an Unknown Woman (La Belle Ferroniere), Bolcato’s oil paintings are fun and approachable. We’d love to see him expand on the series…. The possibilities are endless.

More LEGO art here and here and here.

Via stefanobolcato.com and Instagram

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Legos and art have been crossing paths for years now (here and here and here). These colorful bricks that come in a vast spectrum of colors inspire not only young children, but also creative-thinking adults the world over. We are in awe of this brilliant ad campaign for Lego from a few years back, featuring highly minimalistic configurations of single-stud bricks depicting some of the most iconic paintings by masters from da Vinci to van Gogh. The human brain is truly intriguing. The fact that most people would recognize these works of art, with mere hints of details, really is amazing when we think about it. Kudos to Milan-based art director Marco Sodano for the clever concept and flawless execution.

Via Behance

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In case you’re not aware, there’s a new niche of photography on the rise, “smartphone photography”. With Apple’s recent announcement of yet more improvements to the already outstanding iPhone camera, this new brand of photography should come as no surprise. Though smartphone cameras don’t (yet) rival the quality of digital SLRs, they have come a long way, and there’s something to be said for their accessibility and convenience. So, it’s no wonder visual artists are compelled to simply reach in their pocket when it’s time to capture some creative brilliance. New Jersey-based visual artist/photographer/college student Adam Hillman is a perfect example. While the quality of his conceptual thinking and execution are rooted in traditional visual art as we know it, part of what defines Hillman’s work is his use of his smartphone. For one, his photos are unedited… what you see is what you get. And with a broadcast vehicle (the great big internet) basically integrated into his tool of choice (smartphone), the accessibility of his work is a key part of its appeal. Hillman’s appreciation for modern art is clear, and his use of color and order are a real draw for us (see previous posts here and here and here). We will be interested to see how Hillman’s work evolves over time. From the look of it, he will be making a name for himself well beyond these early works.

Via Instagram

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Simpsons fan or not, this massive replica of Springfield is utterly impressive. No kit or instructions here for Illinois-based master Lego builder (and fellow graphic designer) Matt De Lanoy. This Simpsons super fan and Lego lord exhibits an incredible attention to details with these colorful bricks. From Krusty Burger to Moe’s Tavern, Kwik-E-Mart to Ned Flanders’ house, De Lanoy managed to build some of the most recognized landmarks featured in the animated series’ famed history, now going into its 26th season. More Lego posts here and here and here.

Via Flickr

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With the recent success of the Lego Movie, topping the box office for the third week in a row, we thought it appropriate to share this imaginative use of Lego bricks. From the creative mind of Amsterdam-based art director/photographer Elroy Klee, this fantastic series features models donning solid-colored Lego hairstyles. Awesome concept, and even better execution. Well done! More Lego work here and here and here.

Via elroyklee.com

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A few years back Pilot advertised its line of extrafine pens in a particularly clever way. The campaign, by Barcelona advertising agency Grey, featured Lego mini-figures with highly detailed tattoos. Really clever. We love all things Lego (here and here and here)… this campaign definitely gets a thumbs-up from us!

Via designboom

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It’s widely known that we love Legos. Such a pure, highly creative toy for all ages. And we really appreciate when people find new ways to express themselves through these brilliant little bricks (here and here and here). This amazing Lego DSLR by Taiwanese Lego enthusiast known simply as RGB900 is no exception. The details are awesome: lens made from rubber Lego tires (complete with red ring found on some Canon lenses), hot shoe mount complete with removable flash, and flexible strap, presumably built using Lego tank tread parts. One word: wow!

Via Flickr and brickshelf.com

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We’ve shared our fascination with Legos before (here and here and here), but we’d be remiss to not mention New York-based artist Nathan Sawaya. He has taken the use of Legos as an art medium to a whole new level. With more than 1.5 million colored bricks in his New York art studio at any given time, Sawaya painstakingly transforms these tiny bricks into incredible sculptures. “These works are very personal to me, since they reflect my growth as an artist as I strove to discover my creative identity,” says Sawaya. Be sure to check out his traveling exhibition, The Art of the Brick, currently touring North America and Australia.

Via brickartist.com

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